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High Performance Python for Data Analytics

 
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Hi,
Does the book cover basic data analytics concepts and potential use cases ?

thanks,
Paul
 
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The book is based on examples/use cases. But it doesn't cover data analytics concepts per se. The content is about how to implement fast Python for data analytics.

So, it discusses how to optimize Python libraries used for data analytics (NumPy or Pandas, for example) and storage related frameworks (Apache Parquet, for example).

It does have a chapter that is very data oriented in the sense that it discusses optimization from the point of view of processing incomplete amounts of data (using the data statistical properties to decide on how to subset data without loosing precision) - The point being if we are able to reduce the amount of data that we need to process then computation becomes more efficient. But save for that case, it discusses the optimization of the Python ecosystem and not data analytics concepts.
 
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Hello,
it strikes the right balance of flexibility, speed, and learning curve. I can’t think of any practical problem that can’t be coded in Python - and no one has to be the world's top coder to implement.

when I was in (chemical) engineering school, everyone solving machine learning or simulation type problems learned Matlab or Python, with more people gravitating towards Matlab. These days, it seems, more people gravitate to Python as the ultimate tool, with Matlab being more application-specific. And I think this is universally the case across the sciences. It’s what people know.

Python was quick to add specific packages for handling all sorts of domain specific analytics challenges.

it’s free and accepted among large companies.

there really aren’t any obvious capability benefits to using anything else, other than ease of use at a cost of flexibility.

I hope this will help
 
paul nisset
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Thank you Tiago.
It sounds like a really useful well scoped book .

The point being if we are able to reduce the amount of data that we need to process then computation becomes more efficient.


This is an interesting concept .

 
Consider Paul's rocket mass heater.
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