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Data-Oriented Programming: How is it different from FP?

 
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Good day,

How is DOP different from FP, and what are the reasons to choose DOP over FP when building an application?
Also, some of the code examples uses hash maps. Is that a code smell called Primitive Obsession?


Regards,
Joey
 
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If FP refers to Functional Programming...

I think the concerns of DOP and FP are different. Maybe the comparison would be more OOP to FP.
As stated in the book's page at Manning, seems that the DOP aims to separate code and data to simplify state management and eases concurrency.

But I'm sure Yehonathan would clarify it better.
 
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The main difference between DOP and FP is about how we treat data.

In most FP languages (e.g. OCaml, Haskell), data is statically typed. As a consequence, data access is not flexible. Whereas in DOP, data can be manipulated via generic functions.

For instance, in DOP one could write a function renameKeys that rename some fields in a record. This function would work with any record e.g. a Book or a User.

In traditional FP, one would have to write two separate functions renameKeysInBook and renameKeysInUser and to create two records Book2 and User2 with the new keys.

In traditional FP, field names compile away where in DOP fields are first-class citizens.

You can read more about the conceptual approach to information in this article.
 
Jose Samonte
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Thank you for the explanation.
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
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