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Setting up development environment on CentOS

 
Greenhorn
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I currently do all of my java Spring Boot development work on a windows 10 PC.  I need to learn how to setup a development environment on an AWS ec2 instance running CentOS.  My Linux skills are extremely rusty.  I have never done java development work on a CentOS box.  I do understand how to create AWS ec2 instances running CentOS so that part is no problem for me.

I also edit XML documents that use a complex schema using Altova XML Spy.  I won't be able to use XML Spy on the CentOS box because I won't have a license there.  Can someone recommend a linux application for editing complex xml documents?

Can someone recommend articles/videos/books that will help me to get eclipse installed and configured on a CentOS box?
 
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It's a no-brainer for me. If memory serves, I simply download a ZIP distro from eclipse.org and unzip it. Ready to run. I think it even includes its own JDK these days. Or it will scan your computer for a usable one. Incidentally, the favored location for installed JDKs and JREs on CentOS and other Red Hat distros is /usr/java and it contains softlinks for "latest" and "default" versions.

Your bigger challenge in running under an AWS instance is that it's a remote host for a GUI app. You'll need to ssh in with the '-X' option and I'll not answer for sluggish response. A better approach would be to run Eclipse locally (in a VM if not native). And I can vouch from long experience that anything developed on a Windows copy of Eclipse will run in CentOS as long as it's designed according to standard Java write-once/run-anywhere principles.

The Eclipse IDE can edit and format XML including references to DTDs and schemas. It used to be a bit flaky but I think it has been OK for years now.
 
Marshal
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As Tim hinted at, running Eclipse with X-Windows over a WAN (even a relatively low latency connection in the 15-30ms range) is not an nice experience.  If you do need to work with a remote development environment, consider using VS Code.  It has the capability to run in a split mode where the IDE's user interface locally, but code checkouts, builds and execution occur on the remote platform.  The VS Code Java support actually uses a lot of Eclipse components, so it may feel familiar you out of the box, especially if you use the Eclipse key mappings.

As Tim also mentioned, is possible, consider running Linux in a VM running under on you existing Windows 10 platform, or maybe on a repurposed hardware platform.  If you would be paying for the AWS VM yourself, consider the cost - where I live, a 4vCPU/8GB instance plus storage and traffic costs is around $100 per month.  If it was me, I would probably put 6 months of that money towards an equivalent local development environment.

Regarding Altova XML Spy, I have the same issue - my license is for Windows, but since I need to have a Windows setup anyway to run MS Office applications (Word, Visio, etc.), I just continue to run it there, and haven't bothered looking for any other solution.
 
Tim Holloway
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Further note on Eclipse. Eclipse debugging uses the debugger that's built into every JVM. When you start a Java app with debugging switched on, the JVM opens a network port that exposes a text-mode debugger. IDEs like Eclipse front-end that text mode debugger with their own GUI to make things more pleasant.

But since all debugging is done via that network connection, all debugging sessions are ultimately remote debugging* and the IDEs do that very well, since unlike the GUI windows, the actual debugging data is very low bandwidth.

You don't actually need extra software to debug code in a remote VM like AWS.
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* Although for local apps, the remote address is "localhost"
 
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