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Should I stick with my low effort, basically free money job until i finish university?

 
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I am studying Corporate IT, but I am interested in programming in Java and C#. My current job is really a free money one, only takes like 2-3 hours to finish the daily work, and it's from home.

However I am not programming anything, which really worries me. I will graduate in approx. 2-3 semesters, and I do not want to get a degree with 0 programming experience.

Thanks in advance.
 
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What's corporate IT? How does it differ from other CS courses? Don't you have any modules requiring you to program something of any size? Do you have an industrial placement? Why did you choose those two languages? The principles of programming are ot a great extent language‑agnostic.
What sort of things would you be interested in programming?
 
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The way I see it, if you don't have any experience with programming, you're not going to get a job as a programmer unless it's an entry level job where they are willing to train you directly from the start.

Why not teach yourself some programming in your spare time during the next few semesters?
 
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:What's corporate IT? How does it differ from other CS courses? Don't you have any modules requiring you to program something of any size? Do you have an industrial placement? Why did you choose those two languages? The principles of programming are ot a great extent language‑agnostic.
What sort of things would you be interested in programming?


It is basically a mix of corporate economics and IT. We had classes like networks, Java, C#, MySQL, SAP and SPSS. Basically have basics in stuff but not an expert in neither, but we do program, yes. In my current work I am in the cybersecurity side, but doing mainly administrative work, but i can finish the daily work in 2-3 hours, so free money while i am in university.
I chose the two languages because we are studying these in the university.
 
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Stephan van Hulst wrote:The way I see it, if you don't have any experience with programming, you're not going to get a job as a programmer unless it's an entry level job where they are willing to train you directly from the start.

Why not teach yourself some programming in your spare time during the next few semesters?


We have classes in the two mentioned languages, so I have the basics for them.
 
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In that case, I strongly recommend you work on some hobby projects before you give up your current job. Think of an application you want to build, and force yourself to build it. If you don't know how to tackle certain issues, do research. That's how you get experience that will help you to get a programming job.
 
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Stephan van Hulst wrote:. . . work on some hobby projects before you give up your current job. . . .

That means the same as I said:-

What sort of things would you be interested in programming?

Do you have the option of taking modules with more programming in? Do you have the option of a “free” or “project” module where you can produce an application?
 
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Aron Gaspar wrote:In my current work I am in the cybersecurity side, but doing mainly administrative work, but i can finish the daily work in 2-3 hours


That might look to you as an unrelated experience you are gaining now, but don't underestimate that. At least to some extent.

In software engineering you are not programming all the time, there are bunch of other things you need to do be able to do:
  • That may include writing technical documentation, i.e. simply documenting what you have done and how, so other person could get a good contextual intro on how to do a task if they were do it
  • Draw diagrams - so the team could get a better understanding of some system or its singular/or more components design, and that could be the basis for the discussions on improvements


  • So what I'm trying to say, if there are 2 hours of regular daily work you need to do - you really can step out of the box and shine more than you think you could.

    Why I'm saying that: these days in the interviews not only your coding skills are assessed, that might be the only one part in the long process, and might be even least significant. You could be asked to talk through your previous work position and explain how you did things, you may be asked to whiteboard something, and guess what - if you were to draw some diagrams now, you'd need just to remember during the interview what you done recently.

    So, despite all that, it is fully understandable you want more exposure in programming as such - that will come. Good luck.

     
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    Hi, I studied Arts,  but I want to get a job in IT, so what I did was to make a profile on Fiverr, to see what people may ask me to do if I want to do a gig, in other word, to find out what I need to learn. I applied for jobs and went for interviews to see what they request and work on that, when I got rejected I asked why and specified that the answer would help me to get a job in IT. I started  my own website where I upload my projects, I upload on Git Hub my progress, so the future employers can see my work and the chart of the days that I posted new work . The more you post, the better.
    Keep in mind that the universities usually teach you skills but don't prepare you for something specific and for real life work.

    The most important part is to have a portfolio and I don't mean 1 project, at list 3 or 5. If people want to hire you, in your position, the most important quality you can show is willingness to learn , or proof that you work hard:))

    I am the same, work a full time different job and in my spare time practice coding and one piece of advice, don't think what would be enough for an interview, think how to impress them :))
    One friend of mine who started late in life a programming carrier he said that he impressed his future employer with a few eye caching things on his app. So, think how to make your projects to stand out.
    And yes, my advice is to keep the job, and work in your spare time on portfolio to get a job that you want.
     
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