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Beginning JSP 2: From Novice to Professional by Peter Den Haan, et al

 
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<pre>Author/s : Peter Den Haan, Lance Lavandowska,
Sathya Narayana Panduranga, Krishnaraj Perrumal
Publisher : Apress
Category : Servlets, JSP and Tag Libraries
Review by : Dirk Schreckmann
Rating : 8 horseshoes
</pre>
"Beginning JSP 2?" Yeah, right. Try: "Beginning JSP 2, HTML, JDBC, Java, JSTL, XML, XSLT, XML DTDs, XML Schemas, Servlets, Filters, with some MVC (Model 2) and Struts thrown in for Good Measure". While my recommended title is a bit too long to be practical as a book title, it would better capture the materials covered from an introductory level, in "Beginning JSP 2".

In about 360 pages, through 10 chapters, this book covers the technologies listed above, describing what they are, what they do, why folks are using them, how to use them, and how they relate and work with other technologies. Following these action packed chapters, the appendixes serve as great quick references on JSP syntax, implicit JSP objects, and various XML configuration files.

To nitpick a bit: The book could benefit from some more aggressive editing, in parts, where sentence and paragraph wording is occasionally a little clumsy, and a few good-to-understand details were left out.

The description on the back cover of the book says, "All you need... is a basic understanding of HTML and Java." I suggest this be corrected as follows: "All you need to know in order to follow and understand the lessons in 'Beginning JSP 2' is enough HTML to create a 'Hello World!' web page, and enough Java to create a 'Hello World!' application." On second thought, even if you can't do those things, yet, after reading this book, you'll be able to do a whole lot more.


More info at Amazon.com
More info at Amazon.co.uk
[ September 28, 2004: Message edited by: Book Review Team ]
 
Greenhorn
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not good one for beginners as the name metioned.

some errors

for example..



This book has been written for the latest incarnation of the Apache Foundation'sTomcat Web server, which is version 5.0.

Create one last variable by following the same process. Call it CLASSPATH, and give it a value of %CATALINA_HOME%\common\lib\servlet.jar;.



if it`s tomcat 5, so the lib should be servlet-api.jar.....not servlet.jar.
servlet.jar is in tomcat4..... :roll:
[ October 06, 2004: Message edited by: Thomas Paul ]
 
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Beginning JSP 2 has had an eventful start in life. It was written when both Tomcat 5 and JSP 2 were still in development, edited and published by Wrox in great hurry just before they went bankrupt. If you find the Wrox version of this book somewhere, to be honest, stay away from it unless you need a sturdy monitor stand. Buy the Apress reissue (as reviewed above) instead. Matthew Moodie has done a brilliant job re-editing the book.

Thanks for the review, Dirk; and HZ, apologies for the occasional remaining rough edge. Fortunately the servlet-api.jar one is not hard to figure out.

- Peter
 
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Hi Peter!

I got the wrox version of this book and studied it closely. Yes there are many problems on editing and many lines of code need to be fixed but I didn't feel too painful to figure out things. The examples did run after some slight editing on my own. I liked this book, honestly!

But I did get headaches. During last summer I worked in an 10000+ employees organization ChinaBird as an intern and by that time I was the only one who could program in java in their IT department, where about 50 developers were developing in Delphi or working on IBM Lotus Notes platform. I could not get my hands dirty in their Delphi based ERP system so my manager asked me to do something on their web publication. So I was there working on the ChinaBird JSP application all day long, all alone, from the lowest data layer to presention... The mistake I made was having used the Tomcat 5.5, the deployment configuration of Tomcat 5.5 was so, so different from Tomcat 5.0, and by that time, the documentation of Tomcat 5.5 hadn't been finished, confusion was the only thing I got from its official site. I had really hard time when testing and deployning. Days ago I got message from my ex. manager in ChinaBird, now they have moved to Java. I guess my broken application also counted.
 
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