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Q 4 Mr. Hunt & Mr Thomas (3): unit test & development cycle

 
blacksmith
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Dear authors,
Does your book treat the subject of unit testing
as an integral part of the software development
cycle and thus as something that grows from the
roots of the system. In other words does every
increment of software development have one of
more unit tests and are those tests modelled
in order to go with the changes that will
follow on the code until it reaches completion
(whenever this might be).
Or are these tests primarily meant for checking
the working of 'completed' software after it has
been submitted to adaptive of corrective changes?
Thank you,
Gian Franco Casula
 
author
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Originally posted by Gian Franco Casula:
Does your book treat the subject of unit testing
as an integral part of the software development
cycle and thus as something that grows from the
roots of the system.


Yes, but perhaps not in the way you meant.
Unit testing is testing for developers on code that they've just written (or code that they're about to write). As you develop a system, you also build an increasing corpus of tests, tests that should be run all the time to validate that recent changes haven't broken old code.
These unit tests are only indirectly tied to the functional evolution of the system. They aren't even a separately planned project activity. Instead, they're just something you do when coding. In the same way that you don't break out "compile code" on a project plan, you don't break out "unit test."
 
Ranch Hand
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Originally posted by Prag Dave:

Unit testing is testing for developers on code that they've just written (or code that they're about to write). As you develop a system, you also build an increasing corpus of tests, tests that should be run all the time to validate that recent changes haven't broken old code.


It seems like unit testing is going parallelly with the coding phase in a project plan..... So when we are estimating the time that will be spent for the coding phase, we should take account of the time taken for the unit testing as well....
 
author
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Originally posted by Ko Ko Naing:
So when we are estimating the time that will be spent for the coding phase, we should take account of the time taken for the unit testing as well....

I generally don't think this is a good idea. Why? Because unit testing is best done in such a small increments along with the production code that it would be practically impossible to "record" the time spent on writing production code versus time spent on writing unit tests.
 
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