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problem domain or solution domain

 
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hi,
I am confused about the position of sequence diagram. it belongs to problem or solution domain? different books have diff answer.
Please clear up,
Simon
 
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In my experience you can use it in either. You could create a sequence diagram during analysis that only has domain objects in it and then refine it later by adding the solution domain objects you need.
If you find yourself thinking "A sequence diagram would help me understand better what is going on." then create one no matter what phase of a project you are in.
John
 
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Originally posted by Simon Xu:
hi,
I am confused about the position of sequence diagram. it belongs to problem or solution domain? different books have diff answer.
Please clear up,
Simon


The beauty of Object/Entity Diagrams and Sequence Diagrams is that they can be used at any stage of development. You just need to consider the perspective: Conceptual, Specification orImplementation.
From "UML Distilled 2nd Edition" Fowler and Scott, Addison-Wesley,2000


Conceptual: ..you draw a diagram that represents the concepts in the problem domain...
Specification: Now we are looking at software, but we are looking at interfaces, not implementation
Implementation: now we really do have classes and are laying bare the implementation.
You can denote the perspective taken using stereotypes in your UML drawings...<<implmementation class>> for Implementation perspective and <<type>> for Conceptual and Specification
BTW: I HIGHLY recommend this book...
Best Regards



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