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to organize and assign team responsibility

 
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Please help me on this question:
1) When using OOAD artifacts to organize and assign team responsibilities on a project, it is BEST to Single Choice)
a) evenly distribute use cases among team members and have them work as independently as possible in order to minimize code dependencies
b) designate one team for implementing interaction diagrams related to the "common code path" and another team for implementing interaction diagrams related to "code path variations" (for example ? conditional or error paths)
c) divide teams according to package diagram dependencies and utilize use cases to schedule the work for the individual team members
d) divide teams according to the layers in the software architecture and have them work as independently as possible in order to minimize dependencies between the layers}
At first I thought the answer should be "C", but after I saw a post said "I think for Q1 the answer should be D .Please refer Craig Larman, Applying UML and Patterns,Section 39.9.1,Page448.", I got confused. Which one you think is right?
There is another question having 4 correct choices:
4) Which of the following are effective ways to manage an OO project?
a) Organize the scheduled tasks along the lines of the use cases.
b) Organize the test cases along the lines of the use cases.
c) Organize the user's guide along the lines of the use cases.
d) Organize development teams along the lines of the packages.
So the answer "D" must be right. Is "along the lines of the packages" the same as "according to package diagram dependencies"?
Thank you very much!
 
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For your first question, the same thing happened to me. Larman does recommended team working on layers. And you figure each layer will have packages with dependencies, but the layers themselves should have minimal dependencies. Of course the Use Cases do drive the schedule.
Bad question. I would guess D only because I think half of C is wrong and all of D is correct.
4 missleads you to think you answered 1 wrong. But the layered approach is the best in 1 vs. package diagram approach.
I suppose you're layers are in packages for D, i.e. Persistant Services package, so it can be true.
I hate some of these questions...

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David Roberts - SCJP2,MCP
 
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Any one has second opinion on this? I am leaning toward "D" for the first question. But I feel uncomfortable with it saying "as minimum as possible".
 
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Hi,


Originally posted by Jean Huang:
At first I thought the answer should be "C", but after I saw a post said "I think for Q1 the answer should be D .Please refer Craig Larman, Applying UML and Patterns,Section 39.9.1,Page448.", I got confused. Which one you think is right?


This was my post, that you are refering to.I think you were correct earlier.
If you read that chapter, you would realize, that parallel teams according to layers of software architecture would not minimize communication between the teams.Larman suggests this as one of the reasons which may push the development life cycle closer to 2 months.Infact,teams would heavily be dependent on the inputs from other teams - so work as independently as possible in order to minimize dependencies between the layers doesnot seem to be realistic.
Hence, I will lean to C.
Also as Larman suggests assigning responsibilities, scheduling,estimation, etc. should be dependent on use-cases.Follow the use-case driven approach - is his principle.Since package diagram dependencies also depend on use cases, C looks to be appropriate.


Originally posted by Jean Huang:
So the answer "D" must be right. Is "along the lines of the packages" the same as "according to package diagram dependencies"?


I believe Organize development teams along the lines of the packages. would not mean vertical layers of the architecture, but horizontal partitions or packages.
Hence C looks to be right in the first question.
Thanks,
Sandeep
PS : Why does IBM not ask transparent questions?
-- Sandeep
[This message has been edited by Desai Sandeep (edited May 15, 2001).]
 
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I agree with Desai, it wouldn't make sense to try to make teams working on different layers work as independently as possible. They need to interact and communicate in order to precisely define the interactions of the different layers with each other. Answer A would be wrong for similar reasons.
I lean toward answer C.
Junilu
 
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Originally posted by Desai Sandeep:
Hi,
I believe Organize development teams along the lines of the packages. would not mean vertical layers of the architecture, but horizontal partitions or packages.
Hence C looks to be right in the first question.
-- Sandeep
[This message has been edited by Desai Sandeep (edited May 15, 2001).]


I'm a bit confused by what Crag Larman wrote in the book on this. I agree the answer shouldn't be D, but but D can be an answer too if the sentence refrain from using �independently as possibly�, right? Can�t we organize the team to work in separate layers yet ensure we have great communication among the teams to ensure, say each has got good public interface?
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