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Real World Software Engineering

 
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Looking at the summary of this week's book giveaway, it seems similar to a talk I gave on Real World Software Engineering. My talk is targeted at junior developers, trying to introduce to them ideas they wouldn't have gotten in school. I generally tried to avoid talking about coding issues (except for design patterns), and focused more on everything else a developer needs to do.
So if you'll pardon a little bit of shameless self-promotion, I would love to get feedback (especially from our esteemed authors) on my talk. The slides can be found at:
http://web.mit.edu/hershey/www/Real_World_Software_Engineering_files/v3_document.htm

--Mark
hershey@vaultus.com
 
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Mark,
Your talk looks very good and presentable.It covers so many things that I want to learn.That is really great.I have bookmarked your site for future reference.
Incidently, would love to be one of the students hearing you.
Thanks,
Sandeep
 
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
Looking at the summary of this week's book giveaway, it seems similar to a talk I gave on Real World Software Engineering. My talk is targeted at junior developers, trying to introduce to them ideas they wouldn't have gotten in school. I generally tried to avoid talking about coding issues (except for design patterns), and focused more on everything else a developer needs to do.
So if you'll pardon a little bit of shameless self-promotion, I would love to get feedback (especially from our esteemed authors) on my talk. The slides can be found at:


Mark:
Great talk. I suspect it opened a lot of people's eyes.
I'd be interested to hear you give it and see where the emphasis lies. One of the things that's imprtant to me is the idea that a good project doesn't really have separate phases: requirements, design, coding, and so on, but is really just a continuum with different emphases at different times. In a way the feedback is defined not by what you do, but by where you get feedback on what you do.

I'd be interested to get your reaction to Pragmatic Programmer some time!

Dave
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Dave Thomas:
Mark:
Great talk. I suspect it opened a lot of people's eyes.
I'd be interested to hear you give it and see where the emphasis lies. One of the things that's imprtant to me is the idea that a good project doesn't really have separate phases: requirements, design, coding, and so on, but is really just a continuum with different emphases at different times. In a way the feedback is defined not by what you do, but by where you get feedback on what you do.

I'd be interested to get your reaction to Pragmatic Programmer some time!

Dave



That's a good point, and one I'd agree with. I didn't really define I too much in my talk, how seperate or combned thsoe phases are. I sspect if anything I did suggest it might have been a little more seperate, and I'll tell you why. This talk is aimed at college kids. QA is a foreign concept, as are most of the other ideas. I think I slightly emphasized them as indepentent simply in order to get them thinking about it. So testing isn't just, well, I was always compiling and plaing aorund with it when I was working on it. And documentation isn't, yeah, I made some notes as I went along. For groups with some exposure to "real" development, I probably do talk more about how they overlap.
I do mention, however, the concepts of waterfall and iterative work flows, and that the waterfall is very out of favor these days, for most projects. But I think even this concept is a bit advanced, for those who are just hearing that a project consists of more than just a single code-until-it-works phase. :-)

I'm planning on gettig a copy of your book. It looks terrific. The idea seems similar to my talk. My talk was on how things are done in industry, at a high level. You're book seems to be "here are all the industry best practices that you don't learn in school." I suspect it will very quickly get added to my recommended reading list for the talk. :-)
Thanks for your feedback.
--Mark
hershey@vaultus.com
 
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thanks for the link, mark.
i skimmed through the slides because i am at work... i will give the talk a more in-depth review tonight when i get home!
 
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