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basic question

 
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(for a good design)do we need to have Class, Object and Serquence diagrams for all OO projects.
 
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Hi Sridhar Satuloori,
With my small experience,I can suggests its enough if we have use-case diagram,use-case realization diagram,collboration diagram,class diagram and sequence diagram.
Some its also depends upon the project you are going to do for example for a RTOS based project,you may to include a state diagram etc.,
Correct me if i'm wrong.
Regards
Balaji

Originally posted by sridhar satuloori:
(for a good design)do we need to have Class, Object and Serquence diagrams for all OO projects.


 
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For a good design, everyone involved in coming up with the design needs to have a clear understanding of the requirements and the proposed solution. UML diagrams themselves don't guarantee this. They may, however, facilitate communication among the designers which improves the chances that they will come up with a good design.
So how do you know you have a good design? Look for these characteristics:
1. Loose coupling between parts
2. High cohesion within parts
3. Intent is clear
4. The actual software works as expected and works well
My $0.02
Junilu
 
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what is a use-case realisation diagram?
as far as my experience goes, sequence diagrams are essential but the others, as junilu said, are something you use if it helps. i've never seen any benefits from imposing a strict rule requiring such-and-such a set of diagrams.
actually a database schema is pretty essential too although it's not strictly part of an OO design process.
 
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If U need to document a lot a project... It s very usefull to create lot of UML diagrams.
I ve used to work on RTOS project (avionics for example) and on this sort of projects , U need to over-document so UML CASE tool is very-very usefull
 
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Does the book "Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns" cover this question in detail? Does it cover the points that JUNILU is talking about?
Where can I get the list of good books on this topic?
 
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The number of diagrams you draw should be dictated by the needs. But class siagrams and sequence diagrams are pretty much the basic foundation blocks and should be a part of all projects. Regarding Object diagram or state diagram- you have to resolve it on a case to case basis. The best place to start is to undersatnd what the diagram conveys: if it conveys some useful information- you must draw it.
With UML tools- the diagrams are pretty easy and quick to draw. Most tools do a very good job also of reverse enginering too.
HTH
Sanjay
[This message has been edited by Sanjay Bahal (edited November 13, 2001).]
 
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