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Jonas Jacobi

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Recent posts by Jonas Jacobi

Hey Nimo,

I believe there is a misunderstanding here. WebSockets is not a replacement or a better Ajax. You should look at WebSockets the same way you look at a TCP socket. Instead of coding against the WebSocket APIs directly, you should use a protocol client such as XMPP that has been built on top of the WebSocket API. This will let you communicate directly with the XMPP server from the browser via a WebSocket-enabled server (if the server has been properly designed).

A demo example of how this can be done you can see here - http://www.kaazing.me This site shows how you can use XMPP over WebSockets to communicate with Google Talk (hint: use your Google account to login and chat).

Or, you can read this article - http://www.sys-con.com/node/779407 - which covers this topic well.

Cheers,
Jonas
Author Pro JSF and Ajax
Neither

Unless you are talking about specific eclipse plug-ins or Sun Studio Creator. I personally prefer JDeveloper's JSF support

Jonas
15 years ago
JSF
If you are new to JSF (and Ajax) I would recommend that you pick up one of many great books available that are focusing on teaching you the basics/foundation of JSF respectively Ajax.

JSF in Action, Manning
JavaServer Faces, O'Reilly

Foundations of Ajax, Apress
Ajax Patterns, Apress
Ajax in Action, Manning

When you are comfortable with these two technologies/techniques the next good volume in your collection would be our book

- Jonas
15 years ago
JSF
Thanks, I hope you enjoy it.

- Jonas
15 years ago
JSF
The book does not require prior knowledge about writing components. But, it is recommended that you are familiar with JSF and its concepts, plus knowledge about Ajax and, of course, Java/JSP.

The first 3 chapters will introduce you to JSF and writing JSF components. Chapter 4 introduces the client side technologies you are about to use to add richness.
Chapter 5-10 is a deep dive into JSF land to make the components you created in chapter 2-3 much richer.

- Jonas
15 years ago
JSF
What is going to determine if you CAN use them, or I should say JSF, is whether the provider - in this case Yahoo - provides you with a J2EE container.
15 years ago
JSF
John and I are presenting at the NYC conference, so if you are coming please let me know so we can plan for a beer or two

Jonas
15 years ago
JSF
Hi Sergey,

When we started our book project we had set out to create a book that would cover all aspects of JSF component development, not just creating a simple UI component. At the time ADF Faces was still a property of Oracle and we were legally bound to not discuss the internals of it e.g. concerns about IP.

This forced us to come up with new solutions to some of the problems already solved by ADF Faces and other component libraries.

Of the two projects - we actually have a third project D2, but we can leave that out for now [shameless pitch] - Weblets is the project that solves an issue that for example ADF Faces, MyFaces, Backbase and others have already provided unique solutions for - resource loading. Weblets is solving the resource loading issue with a goal to simplify resource loading not only for component developers, but most importantly for application developers using JSF component libraries.

Mabon on the other hand is a new project that provides a solution that allow component developers to utilize JSF's managed bean facility to deliver data to Ajax-enabled JSF components. This is currently not available in ADF Faces.

We are of course happy to have been able to come up with these solutions and we hope that component developers will like them as much as we do.

- Jonas
15 years ago
JSF
Hi Bruce,

The two books you mentioned are excellent intros to the technologies used in our book.

Basically, we are not spending time introducing you to JSF and building applications with it, nor do we spend time explaining Ajax (we do have some compact overviews of them, but that is it). The focus is to build cool and rich JSF components.

Here is a quote from one of the reviews on Amazon, which I think reflects well what we set out to do:

It is not a book about Java Server Faces, and then, seperately, a book about Ajax technologies. Rather, it is a book designed to help developers who are interested in leveraging both technologies together to create powerful components for their applications.

15 years ago
JSF
Since you are already familiar with

Ajax

you know the two response types that you can be used to fetch data - and .

Which one to use? A good rule is to ask yourself if you control the syntax of the response. If you do, then you can

safely

use the responseText type in combination with JSON syntax and the function.

We have an example in our book on how to integrate Ajax data fetch with JSF - its in Chapter 7.

Eric, are you coming to the

Real-world Ajax

Conference in NYC May 5-6?

- Jonas
15 years ago
JSF
Well, I guess I'm not the right person to answer this since I wrote the book with John , but I think this quote pretty much says what we wanted to achieve with the book:

"It is not a book about Java Server Faces, and then, separately, a book about Ajax technologies. Rather, it is a book designed to help developers who are interested in leveraging both technologies together to create powerful components for their applications." - J. Sager, amazon review

We are not trying to teach you Ajax nor do we try to teach you JSF (although we do have some intro to both). We expect that you are already skilled in these technologies/techniques. The goal is to provide a professional grade book teaching you how to make them work well together, and how you can leverage JSF to provide some cool rich components.

Hopefully you will like it

- Jonas
15 years ago
JSF
Hi Paul,

Our book is leveraging the Dojo toolkit to provide the "Ajax"-feel to our JSF components.
15 years ago
JSF
As we state in the book description on Amazon.com "This is not an entry-level tutorial ...", so I guess it will be #3

"3. Somebody who knows both of these technologies."

If you are just starting out with JSF and Ajax you should get a book or two that introduces you to those two topics e.g. Foundations of Ajax, Ajax in Action, JSF in Action. After reading up on the topics you will really appreciate our book when you pick it up

Cheers,
Jonas
15 years ago
JSF
There are more to it than meets the eye, but I would probably not migrate a current application from Struts to JSF. Gregg's proposal is also what I would suggest - any new projects starting, use JSF.

There are more to JSF than "just" the viusal aspect - event/listener model, state saving, etc.. it is a pretty solid framework with lots of extension points giving developers the freedom they need.

Here are some open source examples on what can be done (not just components):

Weblets
Mabon
Facelets
Shale
15 years ago
JSF
There are several Eclipse plug-ins available that provide JSF support, but there is also an Eclipse project on its way supporting JSF - a subproject to WTP.

The JSF Tools Project

Planned first release - June, 28, 2006. Aligned with the WTP 1.5 Final release.

- Jonas
15 years ago
JSF