Pedro Fracarolli

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since Sep 03, 2008
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Recent posts by Pedro Fracarolli

See, you're adding this attribute to your HttpServletRequest:



and you're accessing the attribute this way in your EL:



Excuse-me if I'm being ignorant, but shouldn't you actually need to use the value stored in the StudentConstants.STUDENT_LIST constant to retrieve the request attribute from the EL statement?



13 years ago
JSP
Hi, Chad! Hope I win that book.
13 years ago
The problem with learning a lot of programming languages is that this demands a time that you could be using to develop interesting stuff in one programming language. Some people concentrate so much in learning new things that they end up knowing a bunch of tools, but didn't produce anything valuable in any of them.
I think it's useful, though, to learn concepts that are new to the industry. I believe that, once we have the necessary knowledge, we can implement anything in any language, with only a very few specialized exceptions.
13 years ago

Leandro Coutinho wrote:Just technical skills are sufficient to be just a programmer.



It's sad, but I have to agree with you. And this doesn't apply only to programming jobs. I've already seen some guys that weren't able to write an e-mail correctly in their native languages being hired as project managers, but they didn't had even tech knowledge .
13 years ago
It seems that the answer for the question is NO. They DON'T have to be developers.
In my first post, I only considered my own experience as the basis for the answer. Now I see that there are some people who've worked with good non-developer PMs. According to Chad's post, a good project manager knows how to DEAL with programmers, but doesn't necessarily know how to program.
13 years ago
Some programmers often regard programming as an art. They develop software because they have an urge to create things, like all artists. Moreover, they want to express themselves through software development.
However, an artistic programmer often faces the dilemma of belonging to an organization. The organization's objectives are often priorized over art, thus making the artistic programmer unhappy with his work. He doesn't want to fix bugs in the customer's code base; he wants to put his imagination at work.
In the company side, the software created by the programmers must deliver value to the customer. It doesn't matter how beautiful is the code, the only important thing is whether the software can improve the customer's competitiveness (and thus justify the big amounts of money that he's been putting on development).
The question is: how can we solve such conflict if interests? Is there any way to bind the artistic aspirations of the passionate artist to the organization's objectives? Or, more directly: could art become competitive in its entirety?

Thanks.

Pedro.
13 years ago
Being "loyal" in the sense that's posted here is a very personal thing, and there are external factors that may change your mind (if you're your home's breadwinner, you're not likely to stay in a company that's threatening shut doors).
There are some people that have a passionate relationship with their works, and they're probably not going to resign until the company's over.
13 years ago
Absolutely yes.

I've already had a hard time trying to explain technical impediments that I might encounter during development to a technically- incapable PM. When they understand about tech, they're likely to soften deadlines when they recognize the work is going to be hard.
13 years ago

Rajesh Thakare wrote:If company is going to close, who will see your loyalty. I personally feel be ( or act being ) loyal who is growing. No point in being loyal with someone who is sinking.



Although I agree with you in some points, I think that we must consider the company's culture when it comes to loyalty. The main reason that makes me willing to move on is not the fact that our unit is circling the drain. The problem is that I can't identify myself with the company anymore. Of course we should take our survival into consideration, but some people just want to stick to here since they can't see a better place to work. If I shared their opinion, I'd probably stay here until the light's turned off.
13 years ago
I'm in a similar situation. The company I work for is a big one, however no projects are coming to our unit and there's a common belief that it'll shut the doors soon. I've been working here for two years and a half and I believe that I had better move on.
I think this loyalty thing depends on what company you're going to apply for new a job after leaving your current one. In my view, since you're not likely to be considered a "number" in small companies, they tend to regard loyalty more than big ones.
13 years ago
Very interesting stuff. Thank you guys.
14 years ago
Hi guys.

Does Struts 2 have support for sending JSON HTTP responses natively? I mean, I can use the println() method from the HttpServletResponse output stream when it comes to Struts 1.2.x in order to generate a JSON response, but, in my opinion, this is not elegant.

If there's no "native" support, would there be a plugin or something?

Pedro.
[ November 11, 2008: Message edited by: Bear Bibeault ]
14 years ago
Hi,

I'm beggining with the Display Tag Library (v1.1.1), and I want it to consider whitespaces when doing the sort. For example, if I have a string column with the value "A[space]", it should come first when compared to a string like "A[space]A".

Is there any "embedded" mechanism that allows me to do that? Any help is appreciated.

Thanks.
What about trying to start the child thread after the parent has done it's job? You could put a call to the start() method as the last statement in the parent's run() code.
There are some news about Groovy's future (and performance) at InfoQ

See ya.
14 years ago