John Griffin

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Recent posts by John Griffin

Prad,

Yes, it is. Whereas Google is designed to search for text in Internet documents, Hibernate Search functions in a very similar manner on database fields.

Hope this helps.
Deepinder,

That is very nice to hear, thanks.

Darya,

We had no specific applications in mind. Hibernate Search is a general purpose framework for providing full text search capabilities with database applications.

As far as reporting goes I don't think it would be a good fit. Remember, it was designed for fast searching.

Hope this helps.
Dick,

As you say, Hibernate Search is an open source stand alone way to provide full text search capabilities with databases.

Proprietary full text search indexes built by databases such as PostGreSQL's tsearch and Oracle's Oracle Text are just that, proprietary. With no information on their structure or workings readily available it's impossible to interface with them.

Hope this helps.
Chandra,

The entire chapter 12 of Hibernate Search in Action is dedicated to document scoring. Not only do we present scoring theory (the Vector Space Model) but also how to change the underlying way scoring is accomplished. We discuss overriding the Similarity class which controls many scoring aspects. We also show you how to write your own Weight and Scorer classes.

In a simpler vein we show you how to set boost factors on various parts of entities and on entities themselves. For example, suppose you have an entity with a product name field and product description field and you set a higher boost value on the name field. Assume you query both fields in an index for "iPod" and the index contains a document with iPod in the name field and another document with "case" in the name field but "fits iPod" in the description field. The document with iPod in the name field will have a higher score than the other document because you boosted the name field.

There are many more possibilities but I'm sure this gives you the idea

Hope this helps.
Leandro,

The integration of Hibernate Search with SEAM is not covered in the book.

Can you elaborate on 'further integrations' we are not quite sure what you mean?

John G
Don,

No, in the strictest sense it does not. It provides the ability to do extensible full text search against a database. That's what it was designed to do and that what it does well.

Hope this helps.

John G
You are correct. Here is the full configuration:

[ December 09, 2008: Message edited by: John Griffin ]
Chandra,

I forgot to add that I'm not quite sure what you mean by non-text but you have to remember this is a full TEXT search engine. If you wanted to be able to search for, let's say, a particular jpg file, then the searchable data would not be the jpg file itself but text-based metadata that was entered about that jpg file.

Hope this helps.

John G
Chandra,

In chapter 13 we discuss using 3rd party libraries to extract text from various formats (MS documents, XML SAX and DOM, plain text, PDF) and place that text into indexes utilizing Hibernate Search. I is very easy to do utilizing the constructs of Hibernate Search and the chapter is filled with examples of how to do it.

Hope this helps.

John G
Paul,

We actually made a conscious decision to stay away from a discussion of other technologies. We have just seen these turn into flame wars when discussed on open forums.

As far as storing indexes in DBs we discuss and discourage this in chapter 11. This is an inefficient way to handle indexes. Every time there is an update or addition there is the possibility of a file segment merge so the index would have to be read and rewritten and there is no way to really predict when this will happen.

That's just a sample of the problems you are faced with.

Hope this helps.

John G
I would recommend the newer edition Java Persistence with Hibernate as a reference book after you have gained a little experience. New users seem to be overwhelmed with the amount of information in this book. There are several additional books out that are a more gentler introduction.

Hope this helps.

John G
Sreerupa,

That is a very general question so I will answer it generally. Hibernate search allows the introduction of full text search capabilities to a database at an abstracted level. What this means to you is you do not have to worry about the many low level concerns necessary with search engine libraries. We utilize the very popular Lucene information retrieval library as the engine of the framework. We have bypassed the serious update problem of a pessimistic lock to the generated index whenever a data update occurs. We provide easily configurable clustering capabilities out of the box and many more advantages.

Hope this helps.

John G
Rogerio,

We recommended having basic knowledge of Hibernate Core or Java Persistence but some reviewers have read the book with no knowledge of Hibernate and some with knowledge of the .Net platform, and found the book useful.

We tried to make the book an easy read. We included a lot of information to explain not only the 'how' but also the 'why'. We believe there is something in t for everyone.

Hope this helps.

John G
Chandra,

Changing relevance scoring is fairly easy. Getting it correct is another story. I wrote chapter 12 which deals exclusively with scoring modification and can be an intense read. It covers overriding the DefaultSimilarity class and writing your own Weight and Score classes.

The key thing to remember is changing it is easy, getting at you want is hard. You will have to test every little change to make sure it's what you want.

Hope this helps.

John G.