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Dipanjan Kailthya

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since Jul 04, 2009
Currently residing in Tokyo, Japan.
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Recent posts by Dipanjan Kailthya

You might want to consider the apache httpclient, which seems to have the timeout functionality.

There is a solution posted herefor the HTTPURLConnection problem but it looks clunky to me...

As with a lot of other things. I don't think there's a 'best' java profiler out there. You need to look at what your needs are, read the specs of a given profiler and balance that with your budget.

Within commercial profilers, a lot of people use JProbe, JProfiler or OptimizeIt. If you google them, you get more information.

For open source profilers, here's a handy list

http://java-source.net/open-source/profilers
12 years ago

Which class has which fields or methods, etc?



That's what the API docs are for.

there are more than one 'same frequency words', so my key is not unique so it is not valid



What happens when you use the word as the key and the frequency of it as the value?
12 years ago

- Girls(female, in general) doing make up . Very often I see that.



Would you rather see boys/men dolling themselves up, instead? :P
12 years ago
Just your friendly neighbourhood windows...




12 years ago
Another problem is that you're creating and displaying your GUI objects in the main thread. All that should really be done in the event dispatching thread. If you're using java6, try http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/javax/swing/SwingUtilities.html#invokeLater(java.lang.Runnable)
12 years ago
You don't have to deploy anything. It should already be running on your unix server as a daemon process. You configure it to publish your logs to a remote server (in this case, your app server). Your app server can then read the data off of the socket and do its thing with it.
12 years ago
Agreed Marco, that is a better solution than having to deploy and manage 30 log transmitter instances.
12 years ago
I don't know of a mechanism that'll give you only the updated bits of a file on a remote host. How about deploying a transmitter application (a JMS client?) on your unix server that monitors the log file and publishes new events to your web app? Lots of possibilities there...
12 years ago
Well, that's one way of doing it... how often will your users be accessing it? Can you do something like pull the latest log file every five minutes or so, if you can't pull at every request? That way your users will be viewing data at most five minutes old. I don't know how acceptable this would be in your application, you have to decide that.

12 years ago
You can possibly use something like the apache FTPClient to ftp the log file(s) from the unix server to your web app host. Depends on how fast your network is, how big the log files are, if ftp is enabled (among other things!).
12 years ago
I was looking at the successful times for this problem submitted by other people and found that the user "Darko Aleksic" posted a correct java solution that supposedly took 3.71 seconds which, while not the fastest out there, is still faster than the OP's C++ code....

http://www.codechef.com/JULY09/problems/CUBESUM/


12 years ago
In that case, I'll be too drunk to find the right train!

But yeah, that's what a lot of people do. You should see the salarymen sleeping on the sidewalk with their leather briefcases as an improvised pillow...

12 years ago