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Dean Iverson

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Recent posts by Dean Iverson

Yes, the first release of my Griffon/JavaFX/GroovyFX integration should be ready real soon now. I'm measuring in days, if not hours at this point.

I'll tweet a link (@deanriverson) as soon as it is ready.
10 years ago
From Amy Fowler's most recent blog:

Attaching a background to something



You can see the whole thing at: http://www.java.net/blogs/aim
12 years ago
No, JavaFX is built upon a new scene graph technology being developed by Sun.

The current version does offer Swing compatibility using the classes in its javafx.ext.swing package. There are several controls in that package that wrap existing Swing controls so you can use them easily in a JavaFX application.

There is also the SwingComponent.wrap() method that takes a JComponent as a parameter so you can use any of your custom Swing components in a JavaFX application.
12 years ago
Tina,

Sorry. I switched from Eclipse to Netbeans about 3 years ago for some NetBeans RCP work, and have rarely touched Eclipse since then unfortunately.
12 years ago
Indab's new music console uses JavaFX in its UI:

http://learnjavafx.typepad.com/weblog/2009/07/making-music-and-software-with-my-friends-in-javafx.html

For me, the sweet spot for JavaFX right now is small to medium web service clients (especially those that require a rich interface). Of course other people use it for games, music (above), and media applications. JavaFX's strengths lie in graphics and animation.
12 years ago

Gregg Bolinger wrote:And on top of all that, if an engine already exists for Java, what does a JavaFX engine bring to the table?



The ability to reach mobile devices.
12 years ago
Stephen covers this topic in Chapter 10 as he takes some desktop examples from earlier in the book and discusses what it takes to run them in a mobile environment.

There are a few things you have to consider when running in the mobile environment. Some are obvious such as screen size, but there are other limitations that are less obvious. But generally, as long as you stick to JavaFX's common profile (i.e. the non-desktop-specific APIs) you won't have too much trouble. The common profile does cover most of what you would normally use anyway, so this is not a very harsh restriction.
12 years ago
Gregg,

Chapter 1 contains a section that describes how to set up, run, and deploy projects from NetBeans. There is also a section that explains compiling and running from the command line. That's it. The rest of the book is about writing code, not IDE how-tos.

For convenience, all of the samples are distributed as NetBeans projects.
12 years ago
As I said in my original reply, I don't know of any JavaFX game engine project. Maybe it's an opportunity for you.

I agree, games are important. JavaFX could be a killer platform for game development as applet deployment continues to improve.
12 years ago
Well said (written), Tom. Those are my thoughts exactly. Well, except that I prefer NetBeans to Eclipse.

(but I'm still 100% behind the concept of better IDE support for both Eclipse and NetBeans)
12 years ago
You can absolutely run the same code on the browser and in the desktop. There are some special cases you may want to handle for a browser environment, but that is easily done by detecting the environment at runtime and using the Stage and related classes such as AppletStageExtension.

Extending a desktop/browser app to mobile is a little trickier. You have to be careful to use only the common profile, which can be slightly limiting sometimes. And you run into other odds and ends that aren't supported on mobile such as string formatting directives.
12 years ago
Flash Lite will allow you to play Flash content on a mobile device, but it's not the same as having Flex on a mobile device. The kind of application development that Flex would give you on a mobile device is what JavaFX delivers (assuming you have a JavaFX-supported device, of course).

I cannot adequately describe how unbelievably cool it is to see your JavaFX desktop application running on a mobile device for the first time.

Sadly, mobile devices that support JavaFX are a little hard to find. Hopefully this will change within the next year.
12 years ago
I don't know of any project that has been started specifically to build a JavaFX-specific game engine, but there certainly has been a lot of interest in using JavaFX for games. It seems like a natural fit for JavaFX's strengths in graphics and animation.

There have certainly been a lot of JavaFX game demos from pac man clones to tank battles (a google search will turn up plenty).

There is also Michael Heinrichs inverse kinematics library for JavaFX:

http://fxutil.netopyr.com/page.php?3

And several blog entries on using a Java-based physics engine in JavaFX games:

http://piliq.com/javafx/?page_id=729

12 years ago
I think JavaFX, like Flex, is ideally suited to creating RIAs that run in the browser and on the desktop. I'm primarily a desktop developer myself and have used JavaFX in several small and medium sized apps for the desktop (primarily web service clients and the like).

I'm a fan of Groovy, but to me JavaFX's syntax is cleaner than SwingBuilder. In addition, the binding support in JavaFX is more powerful and for a project of any significant size I prefer a statically typed language for the extra compile-time checks and the better tool support.
12 years ago