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daryl olson

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since Aug 15, 2000
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Recent posts by daryl olson

I am very interested in RabittMQ-Websockets and Stomp. I see that RabittMQ has added support for these technologies using a bridge between RabbitMQ-STOMP plugin and a Websockets server (SockJS).

I am just wondering how scalable this implementation is and also is it ready for production systems?

Thanks,
Daryl
Struts is extremely popular in the corporate world and with good reason; it does what it suppose to do. If you are going to write you own framework to learn about JSP's, I'd say spend your time on other area's (Struts, taglibs and JSTL, XSLT). The bottom line is that Struts does the job for the MVC and you'll probably end up using it so why not learn some things that will give you more bang for the buck. Just my opinion.
21 years ago
Here's a very good "whiteboard photo" editing package ($US99).
Whiteboard Photo
I would say this is definitly worth using if you have access to a digital camera. Here's a 3rd party review of the product:
Whiteboard Phot Review
Daryl
From your statement, "before it can be passed from servlet to servlet using parms.getString( "whatever" )?" I understand that you want to do a forward from one servlet to another servlet but set an addtional parameter value before doing so.
If my understanding is correct then use request.setAttribute(String name, Object object) before you forward to the next Servlet. Object could be a JavaBean and hold multiple values.
In the "forwarded to" servlet, use request.getAttribute(String name) to retrieve the value(s), remembering to cast the returned value to the appropriate type.
Daryl
21 years ago
Here's a good resource if you want to under stand how security in Servlets and JSP's.
Goto informit.com
then do a search "Advanced JavaServer Pages Security" from the site Search (on the upper left side of the window).
This is a chapter from a book by David Geary.
This site has alot of ver good resources...
Daryl
21 years ago
Hi Eshwar,
I noticed that you are a SCEA. I was just wondering:
1) How useful do you think this has been in your job search?
2)How have you been finding the job market lately? Any sign that it is picking up?
Thanks in advance,
Daryl
21 years ago
I was wondering if anyone has looked at or used the open source Expresso Framework and could share their impressions and/or experiences with Expresso. Any information would be appreciated.
For those of you unfamilar with Expresso, Expresso uses Struts for it's MVC structure and then builds upon this to provide many additional features.
Quoting from the Expresso web site:
Expresso integrates with Struts which is a MVC light weight framework emphasizing presentation and application configuration, and bringing a powerful tag library to Expresso; whereas Expresso adds capabilities for database-stored security, robust object-relational mapping, background job handling and scheduling, self-tests, log4j logging integration, automated table manipulation, database connection pooling, email connectivity, event notification, caching, internationalization, XML automation, testing, registration objects, configuration management, automatic database maintenance and JSP tag library etc. Use Expresso in both non EJB/J2EE sites, as well as scale upwards using J2EE technology. Expresso enables developers to decrease their learning curve and time to solution, which translates directly into reduced costs and increased revenue for customers.
If anyone would like further information on Expresso try:
1) An article which gives a good overview of Struts and Expresso:
http://theserverside.com/resources/article.jsp?l=Expresso-Struts
2) The company that origianlly developed Expresso and also the download site:
http://www.jcorporate.com
Thanks in advance.
Daryl
21 years ago
The given answer of x = 3 and y = 4 is correct.
In the expression "y++ ", ++ is used as a post increment so x is first assigned the value of y (ie 3) then y is incremented (ie to 4).
You would be correct if the expression used the ++ as a preincrement (ie x = ++y
Regarding anonymous inner classes as event listeners, in code such as the following:
Button b = new Button( "Pick me" )
b.addActionListener( new ActionListner() {
public void actionPerformed( ActionEvent e ) {
System.out.println( "You picked me" );
}
});
The addXxxxxListener() call stores a reference to the anonymous listener in the component (ie Button b). Then when an XxxxEvent occurs on the component, the event is passed to the registered listener's event method (ie actionPerformed()) using the reference stored in the component.
If you search this forum for hide and override you will find the following thread:
http://www.javaranch.com/ubb/Forum24/HTML/002192.html
I think that the best responses came from Jim Yingst and Marcus Green. Here's what Jim had to say:
Manish- well the offical definition of overriding for Java comes not from Patrick Naughton, but from the Java Language Specification:
If a class declares an instance method, then the declaration of that method is said to override any and all methods with the same signature in the superclasses and superinterfaces of the class that would otherwise be accessible to code in the class.
The key part here is the phrase instance method. Static/class methods are covered in the next section, Hiding.
The JLS is very clear - you can't override a static method; you hide it. However, to answer Vivek's question, from an exam point of view it may be best to assume that when they say "override" they really mean "override or hide". I say this only because RHE, who were heavily involved in creating the exam, do not appear to make a distinction between hiding and overriding. There's an old discussion about this here. For what it's worth though, I don't think anyone's ever mentioned seeing a question that depended on this in the real exam (and if someone had seen such a question, I'm pretty sure we would have heard complaints about it here.) So: for the exam, don't worry about it, and for the real world, stick to the JLS definition. OK?
And here is Marcus's response:
From the exam point of view I have read feedback from large numbers of people who have taken the exam nad nobody has reported such a question so far.
So I am going to ammend my mock exams to take this question option out.
Marcus
For a good explanation of what is happening hear see the past thread on this same question:
http://www.javaranch.com/ubb/Forum24/HTML/001464.html
In particular read Prabhu's and Maha Anna's responses.
Well, I did what I should have done sooner; I searched this forum for hide and override.
I found an thread on this here:
http://www.javaranch.com/ubb/Forum24/HTML/002192.html
I think that the best responses came from Jim Yingst and Marcus Green. Here's what Jim had to say:
Manish- well the offical definition of overriding for Java comes not from Patrick Naughton, but from the Java Language Specification:
If a class declares an instance method, then the declaration of that method is said to override any and all methods with the same signature in the superclasses and superinterfaces of the class that would otherwise be accessible to code in the class.
The key part here is the phrase instance method. Static/class methods are covered in the next section, Hiding.
The JLS is very clear - you can't override a static method; you hide it. However, to answer Vivek's question, from an exam point of view it may be best to assume that when they say "override" they really mean "override or hide". I say this only because RHE, who were heavily involved in creating the exam, do not appear to make a distinction between hiding and overriding. There's an old discussion about this here. For what it's worth though, I don't think anyone's ever mentioned seeing a question that depended on this in the real exam (and if someone had seen such a question, I'm pretty sure we would have heard complaints about it here.) So: for the exam, don't worry about it, and for the real world, stick to the JLS definition. OK?
And here is Marcus's response:
From the exam point of view I have read feedback from large numbers of people who have taken the exam nad nobody has reported such a question so far.
So I am going to ammend my mock exams to take this question option out.
Marcus