Tommy Delson

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Recent posts by Tommy Delson

So the problem was the distraction from different compile error messages created by my compiler



Yes, different Compiler gives you different error message, but the point here is when you using Generics and Collections in such cases you need to use "super" to add or put object in the List or Map, and the "extends" keyword is work fine with getting objects out of the List or Map.

Have you reread the Chapter section that I mentioned in the previous post? If not, I recommended to reread the section several times until you clear the concept.

Hope it help...
An obvious error that I see is not using "super" keyword when adding to the list. Go back to Chapter 7 on Generic Methods (Exam Objectives 6.3 and 6.4) for more info and to reinforce your knowledge.

Try this:



Seem like you haven't clear the concept, don't worry, it take sometime to clear it. I suggestion reread the Chapter many times until you fully understand each concept.

To address your last question, let me repeat once again "When you use the <? super ...> syntax, you are telling the compiler that you can accept the type on the right-hand side of super".

The point is on the statement above disregards Cat or String objects being add in the list, try to understand what it meant when you use "<? super ...>" syntax?

I let you decide and determine your question what's right or wrong....
In reference to K&B book "When you use the <? super ...> syntax, you are telling the compiler that you can accept the type on the right-hand side of super".

d.add(new Animal()) // won't compile

Problem: You cannot assign a Animal to <? super Dog>. The Animal is too "high" in the class hierarchy. Only <Dog> or <subtype> of Dog i.e Lasie, Wawa etc. would have been legal.
You cannot assign an Animal list to a reference that takes only a Dog (including any subtypes of Dog, of course).

Reread Chapter 7: Generics and Collections, page 619-622 to reinforce your knowledge and clear the concept.

Hope it help...

Anayonkar Shivalkar wrote:The code will compile, but will throw a java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException.



It throws an IllegalMonitorStateException simply because thread "t" calling the wait() method doesn't own the lock with a synchronize(t){...} code block.


In reference to Kathy & Bert book on page 787: Thread Interaction (Exam Objective 4.4) 749 750 Chapter 9: Threads

Note that if the thread calling wait() does not own the lock, it will throw an
IllegalMonitorStateException. This exception is not a checked exception,

so you don't have to catch it explicitly. You should always be clear whether a thread
has the lock of an object in any given block of code.

Reread the Thread chapter and do some more examples that will help reinforce your knowledge and enhance your skills.

Hope it help...


My best advice is self learning and training on in the field that interest you, do a lot experiments on develop Web or UI apps. The same time you can prepare for the developer exam, nothing important and worth than your own experiences.

I recommend go with Spring MVC, JSP, Servlets, J2EE etc. whatever interest you.

The point is what you can do rather what you know in eyes of employers....good luck.

Well done, congratulations! Now what really important are continue enhance your knowledge and utilize it in the real world, this is just a beginning.

Cheers
Congratulations, the job well done, but it's just a beginning.

Knowledge and experience count so, don't stop there, but continue enhance your skills and knowledge in Java. It's worthless to have a certification without knowing how to utilize your knowledge and Java in the real world like having a degree without experience.


Russ Russell wrote:I am having a lot of interest and I am spending a comfortable amount of time at a good pace.

All I'm trying to find out is, how long has it taken others to go through the book and feel comfortable with the material (3 months, 6 months, 1 year)?

Thanks,
-Russ



I completed the book, study, and preparation in about two months, an average hours spending study each day is 4-7 hours 5-7 days a week. Typically other taking average 3-6 months before one ready to take on the Final Exam, some may take longer depend on one how much time, dedication, and readiness.


Within 3 months I think you're ready for the exam, it's depend on how much study and time you put on.

Hope that help...,
Go back and review Java basic instance variables declaration and other Java basic syntax. There are a lot of problems on your code so, it won't work.


Kaydell Leavitt wrote:I recently purchased 7 mock exams from Whizlabs for $50.00. It was a waste of money. Many of the questions seemed to be off-topic and much of the code wasn't indented at all. CertPal.com was free and the questions seemed to be more pertinent (I just scored 91% without wasting much time with Whizlabs).




If you score 91% on CertPal then I'm concern it's not tough enough for testing your knowledge and prepare you ready on the real exam. Try ExamLab for free and see how do you do. To my experience, Whizlab exam 6 was really on the Exam Topics so, I'm not sure about the new one. The real current exam is easier than the mock exam so, don't get disappointed if you get a low score.

Ahh...you're planning to take on version 7 so, ExamLab is not ready for that yet..
A concrete class such as jR3 must implements showIt() method of the abstract class jR2. The rule is any concrete class that extends an abstract class must implement the method it extends, but for the abstract class an implementation of the method is optional.




See K & B Chapter 1 Declarations and Access Control, page 44 on Figure 1-5 for more info and reinforce your knowledge.

Hope it help...




In summary, you need to define the commandClass CmdMasterModule and bind it with command name "cmd". Your bean configuration is not correct so, it won't work. Reconfigure and see if that help...
7 years ago
I see your update controller code, it's not done correctly. You need a good reference or tutorial to walk you through here...

Check this out: http://static.springsource.org/docs/Spring-MVC-step-by-step/index.html

Basically you need to do several things in order to get an updated data on the next page.

1. Passing "projectId" in param or any way you know how to the request in your first page.

(This is where you've missed)
2. Put "projectId" in the session in the controller where it handle the submit form and set all updated value on the object you want to update

3. Retrieve "projectId" in your update controller and retrieve all the value from an object where you have saved set earlier, and set to the instance variables. Next pass it or set to an object you want to update.

4. On your JSP update page retrieve all updated value from an object that you set in an instance variables.

5. On submit you're done.


Hope it help...
7 years ago
I see your update controller code, it's not done correctly. You need a good reference or tutorial to walk you through here...

Check this out: http://static.springsource.org/docs/Spring-MVC-step-by-step/index.html

Basically you need to do several things in order to get an updated data on the next page.

1. Passing "projectId" in param or any way you know how to the request in your first page.

(This is where you've missed)
2. Put "projectId" in the session in the controller where it handle the submit form and set all updated value on the object you want to update

3. Retrieve "projectId" in your update controller and retrieve all the value from an object where you have saved set earlier, and set to the instance variables.

4. On your JSP update page retrieve all updated value that you set in an instance variables.

5. On submit you're done.
7 years ago