Herman Pomstra

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since Aug 17, 2011
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Recent posts by Herman Pomstra

I will try to explain. First of all the example in the book you refering to is to explain how a deadlock can occur. But scheduling threads the sequences are not fixed. That is there are (depending on the processor load en scheduling priorities) several outcomes. A possible outcome of the thread scheduling of the example in the book is (execute order):

1. eatAndDrink:synchronized(food)
2. drinkAndEat:synchronize(water)
3. eatAndDrink:synchronized(water) and eatAndDrink blocks because drinkAndEat has water synchronized
4. drinkAndEat:synchronize(food) and this thread also blocks because eatAndDrink already has food synchronized: hence a deadlock.

But although this sequence will likely be 99 out of 100, once a while another sequence CAN occure:
1. eatAndDrink:synchronized(food)
2. eatAndDrink:synchronized(water)
3. drinkAndEat:synchronize(water)
4. drinkAndEat:synchronize(food) which will print:

Got Food!
Got Water!  
Got Water!
Got Food!

The latter is meant by the answer of the review question 11: IF the code .....
That is for example once out of 100 the code will output and than answer A applies, in the other cases answer F.

Hope this will help you
Sameera it was OCPJBCD 6
10 years ago
Passed my OCPJBCD exam with 88%.

Some tips: read the exam objectives and the spec. Skip almost all about EJB2.1 and earlier versions. The spec is very theoretical so a very good supplement is the tutorial of Krizsan: http://www.slideshare.net/krizsan/ocp-jbcd-6-study-notes. This was very helpful! Many thanks Ivan.

Further I used EPractize and Enthuware as exam preparation. I've read several questions of users regarding EPractize and Enthuware. Here is my personal opinion about the two. EPractize has a theoretical part that matches the exam objective against the specs. The Basic and Advanced Sessions guides you through the theory. Enthuware on the other hand has better matching questions and excelent explanations why answers are good and better though why answers are wrong. So both EPractize (provides some theory) and Enthuware (better matching questions) are somehow complementary.
10 years ago
I passed OCMJD. Received the results today. Passing grades do not receive a score, just the pass. A failing grade will receive section level scoring so that a candidate may isolate the area of failure and resubmit their assignment. Numeric scores are only provided on failures.
Did the essay on july 8. So after nearly three months I finally know something.
11 years ago
In JSP 1.2 the default was JSP. Since JSP 2.0 there is no default defined in the specs. (See specs: <xsd:complexType name="tagType">)

Regards
Herman
EL treats undefined variables as null or zero. So "5 + 3 + a" evaluates to "5 + 3 + 0". This is > 0 so 1 is printed.

Regards
Herman
Hello Karol,

I just passed the OCPJWCD6. I prepared myself by reading HFSJ, the servlet 3.0 spec, the jsp2.2 spec and took the Enthuware OCPJWCD6 mock tests.
First of all, HFSJ is not enough. It covers the main issues and gives you a good sense of servlets and jsp. You need the specs for new things like annotations, async and some minor changes in the JSP. The Enthuware mock tests covers it all and reflects very well the real exam. I scored an average of 72% on the mock tests and 68% on the real exam.

A few answers:

1) the expected number of answers is given, like "choose two answers".

2) answers like "does not compile"etc are not in the most answers but a few.

3) there are a few questions where you have to think like a translator or compiler but not as much as in SCJP6.

4) the mock test is a pretty good representation of the real exam.

5) I'm not sure it is hard to compare.


Hope this helps you.


Regards,

Herman