Win a copy of Testing JavaScript Applications this week in the HTML Pages with CSS and JavaScript forum!

Ray James

Greenhorn
+ Follow
since Feb 14, 2002
Cows and Likes
Cows
Total received
0
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
0
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand Ranch Hand Scavenger Hunt
expand Greenhorn Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Ray James

Another question - the Fastlane Reader pattern does not appear at all in the Core Patterns 2nd ed. book. Does this mean it is no longer a core J2EE pattern?
Thanks Pradeep. That solves the question of the value object. There is still the case of the other two classes though. I also wanted to ask - as these patterns are evolving what is the most source? The core patterns 2nd edition is not posted on the web yet but seems to be the most recent 'official' source.
It seems that the names of the patterns have been changing. The patterns catalog on Sun's site have names like "value object", "aggregate entity" and "decorating filter". However, in the 2nd edition of core patterns they use the names "transfer object", "composite entity" and "intercepting filter".
So are these the new "correct" names for the patterns? Can we use these interchangeably? It seems that the concepts of each pattern are still the same.
-Ray
I have always seen dependencies in component diagrams (the dashed line with an arrow) and even inheritance (dashed with a triangle) but what about a non-dependency association? i.e. when would you use a a solid line association instead of using a dashed dependency association in a component diagram?
I get the point, i.e. use the KISS principle. I think I was getting my goals mixed up for entity persistence and JDBC queries and how to show them on the class diagram. After I made the post I went back to my class diagram an separated these concepts, which simplified the matter. Now I am getting closer to the right number of classes!
Thanks,
Ray
The more I think about this, the more confused I get.
In Craig Larman's Applied UML book, he talks about the concept of regular classes (like Item) versus definition/specification classes (like ProductSpecification) where an Item refers to a ProductSpecification that describes the Item.
However, this concept seems to clutter the class diagram when you are planning to implement the classes as Entity EJBs. Now, you end up creating both a reference class and a definition class for every entity bean.
Is it better to make this distinction in the class diagram, or is it better to combine these concepts (i.e. only use a Item entity)?
Ray
[ August 25, 2003: Message edited by: Ray James ]
[ August 25, 2003: Message edited by: Ray James ]
I'm not so worried about the objectives changing, but I think Sun needs to give advanced notice of WHEN it's going to change. I would hate to walk into the exam and see topics I didn't study for.
Yea, "architect" seems to be the new name for "developer." Also, the learning cycle has shortened. Now all you need is 5 years experience (versus 15 or 20) in order to call yourself an architect because the next big shift is ready to happen - and the cycle will begin again. Where do old architects go to die?
17 years ago

If I fail in an interview just because I do not have communication skills, how should I improve?


If the employees of a company work in teams then naturally it facilitates things if they can all speak/understand/write to each other at a level that is required to do their job. If you're a heads down programmer, then much less is required. However, if you're a team leader then you need a much higher degree of fluency than the programmer does. There are many levels to learning a language, and it is not easy. I've been in brazil for the past few years and I'm just now getting to the point where I feel I'm working at a good professional level in portuguese.
There are other possibilities: the interview was in some way biased or for some other reason just didn't like you - but if that's the case there's nothing you can do about it except go on to the next interview.
Ray
17 years ago
I have a question about the relative value of managers in US companies compared to that of developers. I have worked for several companies that had "dual tracks" where you could go far either as a manager or a techie, with similar promotions and salary. However, I've heard that other companies sometimes have one track where you start out as a developer and can't progress any further unless you become a manager. Now I'm working in South America and I've noticed they definitely value their managers and business people more than techies, so much that there is a salary ceiling for the developers and the managers make nearly twice that. The techies, including architect level people, are seen as basic semi-skilled labor with biz people being perceived as having real value. Any thoughts on this?
Ray
17 years ago
My short answer is, OF COURSE!!! How much do you expect to make? It seems to me that many with far more experience are making much less than this, especially in these rough economic times. To me, beyond 100k you shouldn't preoccupy yourself too much w/ money and start looking more at the work environment and your day-to-day.
Ray
17 years ago
I just took the test and I didn't find the real exam even remotely close to the practice ICE exam, except for the categories of questions. There were a few questions which resembled the practice exam, but they were testing a different concept. You'll need to study everything to pass with room to spare - not just the practice exam. My 2 cents...
Ray
It's true, you probably have more chance of finding a job right now than of getting into a good MBA program w/o experience. Also, don't short yourself; your MBA experience may not be as rich w/o experience to use as a point of reference.
Ray
18 years ago
I have a Connection Pool object which gets and releases connections using static methods. Is there any danger of having multiple threads entering these methods? (I've left out some code for brevity)
static public java.sql.Connection getConn()
{
//ds is the datasource initialized from a context object
return ds.getConnection(uidAux, pwdAux);
}
static public void freeConn(Connection conn)
{
conn.close();
}
18 years ago
Because of budget (and time) constraints, we are using websphere 3.0 and visualage for java 3.02.
I have setup our app and datasources to run in the WTE in VisualAge, but it's really slow and sometimes unreliable.
I suppose another option would be to run the distributed debugger against our test server, which would also be more reliable, but I don't have any experience with this.
Can anyone elaborate on their experience with using these two methods of running tests? Any other recommendations?
Thanks!
Ray
18 years ago