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S Poon

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since Aug 28, 2014
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Recent posts by S Poon

Hello Kishori Sharan,

Nice job for writing these java books!

Since books are not free, besides winning, I wonder why someone should buy your books?

There are great beginners/certifications books by K&B, there is reference book by Herbert Schildt, free Java API ..... and you have internet(forums, tutorials).

So, what is your books selling point? Do you cover 'everything', every tiny detail with a lot of code examples and assignments? Do your books have learning by doing approach?

Besides the content, I love the layout of your books. I think it looks great as a serie on my shelf =)

Congrats,

Steven













5 years ago
Hello Paul and Joseph,

Q1: Since the OCMJEA the exam require you to take an Oracle instructor led course in order to take the exams & not requiring any further java certification, are there any prerequisite or recommendation before reading your book? There are a lot of designers and architects (or wannabes) who don't know anything on J2EE while putting architectural constraints on the solutions without some sound explanations. It would be great to use this book as a starter while passing the exam at the same time:)

Q2: Earlier you (Paul) post about your book covering all the exam objectives, which I find very amazing. While subjects on OOAD, design patterns and security are always tough for a seasoned developer. Oracle exam objectives mentions these books:

Core J2EE Patterns: Best Practices and Design Strategies (2nd Edition)
Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software (GoF)

Are these books needed as supplement for your book?

Q3: Any further preparation recommendations? The toughest part is the essay part I think.


Thanks,

Steven


Hi K. Tsang,

I enjoy reading your post! It indeed looks nice on the wall. Soon you become a SE & EE 5 guru!

Good luck!

Steven

Note: When time past, don't forget to add a second row on your wall: SE & EE 7 or 8 (big big change) =P
Actually you do need to know something about EJB and Servlets for this exam. I wouldn't say it's not relevant for this exam, but you don't have to know everything on these.

Some topics for this exam:

Create an SOAP web service in a servlet container
Create a RESTful web service in a servlet container
Create a SOAP based web service implemented by an EJB component
Create a RESTful web service implemented by an EJB component



Since you passed OCPJP6, start writing some codes. Follow some tutorials about making a POJO webservice. Try to understand the generated WSDL and XSD. Try to test your POJO Webservice with SOAPUI, where you can generate SOAP messages. Learning XML, XSD and WSDL only, is like swimming without getting wet =)

Ivan notes, like himai minh suggest, is a great way to start. Google on tutorials, or read and apply examples in book Java Web Services: Up and Running.

Good luck!

Steven
Hi Jigar singh,

@CrossOriginResourceSharing is just another filter for you servlet which you can configure in your web.xml
With Maven and Hudson, you can automate this configuration & deploy process for your DEV, INT, UAT and Prod.

Check this link out, and you find your answer for the web.xml configuration:

http://docs.safe.com/fme/2013sp1/html/FME_Server_Documentation/Default.htm#Configuring_CORS_Filtering.htm

Good luck,

Steven
Actually, I'm not surprised since this book "J2EE WebServices" by Richard Monson-Haefel is so old. It is indeed a very good book, and needs to be updated. Although concepts about webservice, design patterns and best practices still applies.

But still I wouldn't recommend this book, because coding in Java is dramatically changed since we have annotations. It really makes coding easier for everyone=) Not talking about Under the hood code, because that's basically the same.

I would recommend books of Thomas Erl for web service design and SOA architecture. But maybe too much for this exam=)

Steven



Hi Himai Minh,

To be honest, SCBCD was very hard to learn. That was a time before annotation was even born.

EJB developer exam today looks easy, cover less topics indeed, but you have to know almost everything in detail, technical detail.Second, it is easier to learn since there are a lot of good resources available.

For me the web service exam is less technical compared to BCD and WCD. But you have to know, Webservices are HOT these days.

I would advice you to start studying EJB, try some tutorials... maybe add some web service annotations to try out, and figure out what you feel comfortable with.Both are excellent certificate to have. At last have faith in yourself, everything is difficult when not prepared.

Good luck!

Steven





5 years ago
I agree with the above posts, but this exam isn't really hard to crack. Of course you need some experience with EBJ, Servlets and building web services (JAXWS and JAXRS) on these technology, but this exam isn't really about "HOW to create a web service", but rather from the perspective of an web service expert/consultant giving advice to someone. Would you recommend SOAP or REST web service, what about security, what will you use , why you need it, how do you configure those, what about performance (using MTOM for binary attachment?, asynchronous web service needed?, xml parsing (stax, sax, dom), xml overhead), what about logging (handlers) and so on. For me the most boring part was the Basic Profile, which basically is a law book about what not to do to increase interoperability (between Java en .Net for example). But essential, since that's what SOAP web service are mend for. This exam looks difficult, because web services are difficult. There is a lot of choices to make....even when we talk about configuration, which you can do with annotations, ejb-jar.xml, web.xml, web service.xml, wsit configuration file, vendor configuration file and last but not least the WSDL). Besides vendor configuration file, you need to know these all for the exam.

The easiest way to learn and crack this exam is to understand. There are simply too much topics to grasp and you really don't need to know everything in tiny detail for this exam. Besides, that's why we use google right? =)
Yesterday I past the OCEJWSD exam with 100%! I prepared very well, with Ivan A Krizsan study notes, Mikalai Zaikin notes, Java Web Services: Up and Running by Martin Kalin, documents referred by Frits Walraven in his post https://coderanch.com/t/624027/java-Web-Services-SCDJWS/certification/questions-Enthuware-simulator-OCEJWSD#2853123 and studyguides (webservice course) from Oracle University.This exam was totally different than SCBCD and SCWCD, since there is no complete book for this exam. Furthermore, the topics are very course grained..... typical SOA term. Anyway, for this exam you at least need to know something about:

WS-I
WS-I BASIC Profile 1.1
WS-IT (METRO)
Jason
xml
WSDL 1.1 every element & rpc vs document
PAOS

EJB (Singleton, Stateless)
Servlets (web.xml)
ejb-config.xml
web.xml
webservice.xml
wsit configuration file
wsimport
wsgen

I-Stack (JAX-WS, JAX-B, STAX, SAAJ, FAST INFOSET)
Message Leve Security (XML Signature, XML ecryption)
XKMS, XACML, X.509, XML Encryption, XML digital Signature
Transportlevel security (SSL, HTTP BASIC)
SAAJ
XML Parsers: SAX, STAX, DOM

JAX-RS ( resource & subresource)

Policies
Handlers
MTOM
WS-Addressing


Thank you guys Ivan, Mikalai, Frits (my ex colleague=) and all posting JavaRanchers!

Steven Poon
5 years ago