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Corey Lanum

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Recent posts by Corey Lanum

Hi April,

My area of expertise is in graph visualization, which isn't truly about big data if I'm being honest. You can get value out of visualizing tens of thousands of nodes, but you're limited by the number of pixels on the screen. But graph visualization is distinct from other types of business intelligence in one important respect: Most of the time with graphs, you're aiming to identify a individual data record from among a larger set for scrunity, which happens in domains like anti-fraud. Whereas if I'm looking at say, sales data for a large merchant, it's not the objective to drill down to individual customers. In that scenario, I'm trying to understand patterns among groups of customers and only care about the data in the aggregate. So that calls for a much different visualization technique, something more like what Tableau provides.

So from a visualization perspective (which is very different from a storage or processing perspective, on which I can't really comment), I think the most important thing to think about is what the end goal is. What decisions do you expect to be able to make based on the data you've collected, what do you want to know that you don't know now? That will help guide how you structure, present, and interact with the data in useful ways, as opposed to just throwing the coolest visualizations you can think of on the screen and hope that something interesting happens.

Corey
3 years ago
In the book I spend time with Gephi, which is a desktop application with versions available for Windows, OSX, and Linux, and is open source. For open source libraries, I discuss D3.js in the appendix but there are others, Sigma.js, arbor.js and cytoscape. I use KeyLines.js in many of the examples in the book, but that is a commercial library, not an open source one.

Corey
3 years ago
Hello,

There are two parts to this book. The first is a primer on the concepts of graph visualization and when it might be helpful and the second goes into a bit more detail on implementation using two different tools, Gephi and KeyLines. Gephi is an application that is supported for Windows, OSX, and Linux, and KeyLines is a javascript library. I don't touch on java really at all, preferring to discuss visualization for the web as that is the direction that most applications are going, so the examples are all run through the browser.

Thanks,
Corey
3 years ago
Hello,

The first few chapters of the book are about graph visualization more generically, but the second part is about how to implement those concepts in software. Gephi is an application, while KeyLines is a javascript library. I don't really use Java much in the book, as I focus on graph visualization on the web where javascript is more useful.

Corey
3 years ago