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Laurentiu Spilca

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since Oct 02, 2020
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Recent posts by Laurentiu Spilca

Hi. Quite difficult to cover such complex topics in an answer on the forum.
You could write a couple of books about each.
And there are already a bunch of good books on these topics as well.
You can even find some related videos on my YT channel: youtube.com/c/laurentiuspilca
8 months ago
Hi. I do recommend you the Microservices Patterns of Chris Richardson if you want to learn more on this topic.
It is an excellent book https://www.manning.com/books/microservices-patterns
8 months ago
Hi Andrea,

HIPAA is a set of regulations. I'm a developer, not a law person, so I only follow the requirements in this case.
I have nothing technical to share here, sorry.

Regards,
Laurentiu
8 months ago
Hi Joey,

Thanks for the question. My rule of thumb is this one. If the app needs to share keys, you have to use asymmetric.
You should never be allowed to share a symmetric key, regardless of the number of users, since the symmetric key is private.
Once one has the symmetric key, they can use it to sign tokens. Using asymmetric key pairs gives you the advantage of only sharing
the public key to those who only need to check the signature.

Cheers!
Laurentiu
8 months ago
Hey Matt. No. Unfortunately, to build an authorization server you'd still go with the deprecated Spring Security OAuth until the new authorization server framework will be mature enough to use it in prod.
8 months ago
Hey Nathan. In the repository create a method that finds the records by your condition (E.g name contains :param). You can provide the search term then in your controller by a request parameter or a path variable.
You use that value further up to the repo. Cheers!
1 year ago
Hi Mike. Thanks for the question. I will cover the basics in Spring Quickly in 30 - 50 pages. Of course, Spring Security is a complex topic. One complex enough I've written a book of 560 pages on it. If you already know the basics for Spring you can go directly with learning Spring Security by reading Spring Security in Action. If you don't yet know the basics of Spring, then I recommend you first read Spring Quickly and then read Spring Security in Action. I also share tons of knowledge on my youtube channel: youtube.com/c/laurentiuspilca  There you'll also find a nice playlist on Spring Security fundamentals Cheers!
1 year ago
Hm. That would be difficult. Practically you can create war files with Spring and run them in an application server. However, in software development what you practically do is not necessarily what you should do. Now, the fact that Spring is the management's choice is good. To run your Spring apps in an application server is not what I would recommend. What I would recommend you is decouple parts of your app step by step and run them individually. Use Spring Boot which comes with preconfigured servlet container and convention over configuration. Try to progressively get rid of the application server and aim to a service oriented architecture where each app is independent. In the future this will give you a lot of opportunities, from deployment to work management. Of course, I don't expect it to be an easy job. But it is possible. I've seen it done more than once
1 year ago
Excellent advice, I'll check that too
1 year ago
I John, I hope so. This is the idea of the book. The path should be appropriate for a very beginner. Starts with simple examples and explains them with visuals and code examples as well. Every example is also provided as a project you can import and run yourself.
In the end you should be able to understand but also use the basics of Spring in production-ready apps.
1 year ago
A difficult question to answer in a comment post, Dragos. Thanks for such awesome questions. I actually have a full course lecture in my software architecture course to discuss this topic. Mainly to answer you, it depends a lot on:

- the data model you have
- how much do you care about consistency
- how much do you care about availability
- how much do you care about performance

Then you might decide to use SQL or NoSQL, and mind that NoSQL is not only one implementation. When you decide for NoSQL you have several options. For example you might decide to use MongoDB because your data is modeled as documents, or you might prefer Neo4J because a graph approach fits better to the structure of your data
1 year ago
Correct me if I'm wrong. Isn't that an application server? In this case, we jumped into another subject that goes away from using Spring MVC for that. In that case, you'd probably use CDI directly and then yes, you really on what the AS provides you for JSON deserialization. If you write a Spring app, then you don't need an application server but only a servlet container (which is more light). In this case, you really on what you configure with Spring.
1 year ago
Hi Germán and thanks for the question. The idea of quickly is not about the time in which you can read the book. As a software developer, I learned that the estimations should never be done in time but in complexity. For some readers reading Spring Quickly might take one week while for others it might take 6 months. It really depends on the reader. Now, the idea of "quickly" in Spring Quickly and what I guarantee you is that you will learn for the beginners step by step only what you need to get into working with production-ready apps. So it is the quickest path to achieve this goal starting from zero.
1 year ago
Hi Charles. Thanks for the question. I happen to have used Java/Jakarta EE and Spring as well. There are many similarities but also many differences between these two. I don't think we could cover these in a discussion thread It's rather more of a topic of a separate book.
1 year ago
Hi Charles. I will discuss JDBC with JdbcTemplate and JPA with Spring Data. I also want to cover using NoSQL with MongoDB as an implementation and Spring Data in the book.
As from my own perspective, I do use all in real-world examples. As a consultant, I worked with many different apps that used various technologies.
1 year ago