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Greg Burdett

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since Jan 23, 2003
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Recent posts by Greg Burdett

A JVM has traditionally been packaged with Websphere, so I would assume that is still the case in v7. You should not have to download one separately - unless you want to, of course. It usually does not create problems, but it did in this case, because the update installer was expecting Java 6, and Websphere came with Java 5.
9 years ago
I had the same issue with Java 1.5 (on Windows 2008 / 64), "Cannot locate policy and/or framework files ". I got the policy strength files from Oracle, then unzipped them into the C:\Java64\jdk1.5.0_22\jre\lib\security directory. However, the ZIP file had a path of "jce" for the policy JAR files, and so unzipping them placed them at: C:\Java64\jdk1.5.0_22\jre\lib\security\jce. Even though I put that entry in the Path environment variable, they were still not found. I copied them up one level, to C:\Java64\jdk1.5.0_22\jre\lib\security, and then my Java program worked and performed 256 bit encryption / decryption, so it obviously found the files.

Greg Burdett
10 years ago
I had the same issue, removed my JAVA_HOME and PATH entries, but that did not help in my case. However, I then realized that I had installed the latest version of the Websphere Update Installer, and I checked the Java version on it - it was Java 6, newer than the Java 5 that came bundled with Webshere, and I had overwritten the Websphere install package's JDK directory in the process. I simply unpacked the Websphere package to restore the original JDK directory containing Java 5, and the install worked fine.

Greg Burdett
10 years ago
A few notes on the extended document root that may be helpful. This is intended to be used when you want to serve JSPs or static content that are located outside of your Websphere App's root. For example, you may have them located under the web root, or anywhere else in the file system. You set the extendedDocumentRoot settings in the ibm-web-ext.xmi file. See an IBM document like: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/wasinfo/v6r0/index.jsp?topic=/com.ibm.websphere.express.doc/info/exp/ae/rweb_jspengine.html

What they don't tell you is that you cannot accomplish this by changing the ibm-web-ext.xmi file that is created in the WEB-INF directory of the location that you specified when you deployed your app (assuming that you are adding this feature after you have already deployed the app). You have to go to the location where Websphere has created its own deployed copy of the app in the "cell", and change the file there. Note that at this location, you can also make changes to the web.xml file, and you will not have to redeploy the app. For example, the xmi file on my server was located under:
C:\Program Files\IBM\WebSphere\AppServer\profiles\AppSrv01\config\cells\MyServerNode01Cell\applications\MyApp_war.ear\deployments\MyApp_war\MyApp.war\WEB-INF\
12 years ago