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Robert Skoczylas

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Recent posts by Robert Skoczylas

I'm new to java web services.
I don't understand the relation between J2EE and web services, too.
Can you please say something more about it ?


Miroslav,
In addition to the example that was provided by Thomas, I would like to say that J2EE provides a great platform with all the system-level services that allow one to develop business logic using J2EE and then expose this service using web services technologies. So, J2EE provides the platform where you could run the service.
The attractive part about exposing your new or existing J2EE application as a web service (by using web services technologies) will allow other consumers (clients) to access your service independent of the language in which the client is implemented. Web services promote open standards that are platform and vendor independent.
J2EE and web services can work together because of the following factors:
- Lots of enterprise applications are delpoyed using J2EE technologies. Companies have invested alot of $$ in this technology and could leverage the business logic and expose it as a web service.

- J2EE is an enterprise technology for distributed java
- Java and J2EE is a proven technology
- J2EE specification in embracing Web services standards. Starting with inclusion of JAX-RPC in J2EE 1.4


Hope this helps,
-robert
18 years ago

Obviously web services are either provided or accessed or both by organizations. In an effort to learn more about ws, I imagine you might need to implement ws from both perspectives (provider and end-user).
So my question, does the book, lead you through the paths of both sceanarios or is it geared more towards one or the other?


Yes. We have tried to cover both sides of web services. The book contains a case study that puts all JWSDP APIs together in a complete example that shows how to build a web service (provideR) and a consumer (requestor) of the web service.
hope this helps,
-robert
18 years ago
Yes we do have a section (chapter 13: web services security) that covers SAML. This book has a Java Web services / developer focus and does not cover tools such as Tivoli.
18 years ago
Congratulations to all! I see there's lots activity
on this great site with very knowleagable java / web services enthusiasts. Unfortunatelly, I am away from the US and could not participate as much as I would have like to due to loads of work and limited access to the internet. Thank you Ramesh for taking the time
to answer all of these cool questions. Finally thanks
to Thomas Paul and JavaRanch for giving us the opportunity.
cheers!
18 years ago

It seems that with the weak climate for IT spending the "launch" of web services is slow to take off. I am a consultant and we are starting to slowly see them emerge here and there as useful tools in certain situations, but definitely not the "killer internet app" that everoyne was expecting.
I would very much like to know what our guest speakers think about the future of web services within the short term (3 year timespan)?


I have no idea where Web services will be in 3 years and I don't think anyone could answer this question today. 3 years is more like an eternity in computer time...I could probably tell you what web services are trying to achieve today and in the next couple of months.
I do agree with you that we are seeing more and more projects using web services technologies. It's not a question of inventing a technology that will allow you to build a "killer app" but simply a technology/solution that is based on open industry standards. Why is this important?
Web services technologies will provide many different business opportunities for companies, since companies will be able to communicate with other companies (B2B) independent of their platforms and business implementations.
One area that can be addressed today is in the integration space where we have millions of applications running on different platforms written in different languages that could potentially leverge each other to perform business operations. There are alot of issues assocuiated with such collaboration but the idea is to have technologies that are independent of the vendors specific implementation. So for example, Company A (using Java) can invoke services provided by Company B (using .NET) by using SOAP RPC.
There are lots of initiatives that are going on today and have evolved significantly over the last couple of months. There were many holes that basic WUST (WSDL UDDI SOAP technologies) do not address such as security, transactions, etc ... which are currently being addressed by other standards. These missing gaps likely influence the wide use of web services.
I think it is an evolving area that will only get better. Of course, this is not a silver bullet. It does not solve all problems. In fact, one should be very careful when choosing any technology. It reminds me of the misuse of XML. I think we could all identify one instance of such occurance, where people used XML because it was the cool thing.
In result, it caused many performance issues.
I love XML and I think it is a technology that has facilitated many things.
hope this helps,
-robert
18 years ago