Perry McKenzie

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since Jul 16, 2003
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Recent posts by Perry McKenzie

So Michael,

Given your reply above, who would you say is the target audience for your book?

Cheers,
Perry
I know one thing we ran into with big loads on tomcat servers was making sure we had enough available file handles available on the box. We actually had to increase the number of available file handles to 8k to make things happy.
14 years ago
We've used AnthillPro in conjunction with Perforce and then evolved to CruiseControl with SVN.

Perry
14 years ago
Hi Michael,

I've just been through a medium sized port of an app where we've learned a ton of lessons that I'm sure you covered to some degree in your new book. Some of the biggest lessons our IT group had to deal with surrounded successfully managing builds and configurations for multiple teams in multiple environments with multiple types of web servers to support.

The title of your book leads me to believe you possibly cover release management to some degree, although it isn't really mentioned in the overview on Amazon. Do you think build/release/configuration management (whatever people want to call it) is over-rated or under-rated currently in the IT industry? Could you give us some thoughts to back up your opinion?

Thanks,
Perry
Hi Mike and Michael,

Maybe I can throw in my two cents here...

One technique (if you can call it that) we've found to be particularly helpful to prepare for a production release when you can't really 'test in production' is to have one or more staging environments that mirror the production hardware and network configurations. This enables you to test without worrying about those variables once you've pushed your code to prod. Staging environments set up like this also allow you to load/performance test so you can 'pre-tune' the memory allocation, file handle size, etc. for your servers.

Cheers,
Perry
Thanks for the reply, Ben. Sorry I couldn't offer you more details as the the nature of the requirements, but I didn't know them myself.
I'm working on a project where we're planning on using 'events' to notify different users REAL TIME of changes in entities they have expressed an interest in. Currently we have focussed on JMS to manage these 'events' but I've been looking into Jabber this weekend, thinking it might have possibilities.

Has anyone ever compared these two technologies - advantages vs. disadvantages? Anyone had experience in development using Jabber in an Enterprise application?
Simon, just to clarify - that was Oxford in England. When John originally started this discussion, he was focusing on Ivy league schools. I tend to lump Oxford into that league, even though it definitely is not part of that group.
17 years ago
It probably depends on which part of Canada your looking. On the job boards here, I see lots of java opportunities in Toronto and in the Toronto area.
I'm in Alberta, and if you know the right people and have just a little bit of a network, you can find the job you're looking for. Whether this qualifies as 'in demand' .....
17 years ago
Started in 2001. I have a diploma in Applied Information Technology. Also SCJP and SCWCD certified. I have been working with CGI (competitor of IBM here in Canada) doing J2EE development for the past 1.5 years. I would not have a Java job if I wasn't certified. Certain consulting companies like certifications - and any letters after your name for that matter.
17 years ago
Hi John,
You might find my situation interesting.
I have an IT diploma from ITI. Since then I have gotten 2 java certifications. I don't even have a degree. One of my fellow coders on the last project I worked on has a masters in Economics from Oxford. She has quite a bit more IT experience than myself, but she is from China, and her english is not great. (How she got a masters from Oxford with her english the way it is, is beyond me).
Anyway, over the past year and half, I have worked hard and managed to get some responsibility team leading and composing architecural documents for our client. I have just signed a job offer with another firm in the city I am living in for $28,000 a year more than what I was previously making. My current employer counter offered with something very close, requiring that I transfer, which was unacceptable to me. I think this new salary beats, or is at least on par with what my colleage with the degree from Oxford is making.
From my experience, what you make depends on:
- The type of company you work for. Big consulting companies (at least the one I'm leaving) don't pay as much as smaller software development companies.
- How successfully you market yourself. Your resume, written properly, can get a lot of good attention. The job interview also goes a long way to helping a company decide how much you're worth to them.
- How much responsibility you're willing to accept, and how you apply yourself. If you're known for getting the job done quick and well, you'll become a desired asset in the IT community, whether you've got a fancy degree or not.
Perry
17 years ago
Hi Hover,
Where abouts in Canada are you? CGI in Edmonton is always looking for good java programmers. Even if there isn't a posting on the web site, bother Toronto and Edmonton offices are a great place to start.
Perry
CGI Calgary
www.cgi.com
I believe you can limit the number of connections in the connection pool.
I do know that we use the MVC (Model-View-Controller) pattern, and our controller servlet is where the init() method is. As a result, only one servlet every creates a connection to the database (per application instance). We then locate the connection pool in the init() method and request an available connection from the pool when needed, like Lasse said.
18 years ago
JSP
Hi Chad,
I would agree with what you have said about JDBC connections with servlets. It should be done in the init() method, and yes, it stays active the entire time the servlet is alive, and if two people call the same servlet, they share the connection.
The way we have dealt with the connection sharing is by using a connection pool.
18 years ago
JSP
Couldn't you just reset the arrayList in you form object like:
yourArrayList = new ArrayList();?
Or do the same thing with you form object (if you don't have any other data stored there that you need)?
Of call:
session.removeAttribute("nameOfAttributeToRemove");?
18 years ago