Prag Dave

author
+ Follow
since Feb 17, 2004
Cows and Likes
Cows
Total received
0
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
0
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand Ranch Hand Scavenger Hunt
expand Greenhorn Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Prag Dave

Languages are by and large orthogonal to quality--languages don't write programs; programmers do.

So first and foremost yoy want good developers if you want good code.
15 years ago
First, why are there talks on Ruby at NFJS? Because the attendees go to them. Jay constantly fine tunes the show, cutting talks which don't attract an audience. So, as long as people go to them, and as long as people attend them, the talks will be there.

I personally don't pan on doing any NFJS shows this year--the travel was getting out of hand. Instead, I'm focussing on working with Mike Clark at The Pragmatic Studio, which offers in-depth, three day Rails, Ruby, and Ajax experiences.


Dave
15 years ago
That's great. Enjoy!


Dave
15 years ago
Rails isn't intended to be a 100% solution: DHH's philosophy is to do the 80% really well, and leave the rest to stuff like Java.

Having said that, Rails plays really well with Web Services (and web services), and that provides a good integration point with the legacy world.


Dave
15 years ago
The book was developed in parallel with Rails 1.2, ad documents stuff that's in 1.2. That caused me problems when the book first appeared and 1.2 wasn't generally released, but now that 1.2 is out, the framework has finally caught up with the book!


Dave
15 years ago
Thanks. I've been in these parts before, and no one shot me....

Sorry it took a while to get here: no one told me the week had started


Dave
15 years ago
Thank you--let's have an interesting week
15 years ago
There are two parts to this.

As with Java, there's the laguage, and then there are the libraries.

Ruby 2.0, which is being worked on now, is an evolution, not a revolution. Not too much will change for Ruby programmers--the biggest shifts are in the underlying implementation. I don't see the laguage itself growing.

So, then, what's to stop Ruby having the same kind of library explosion suffered by Java. In theory, nothing. But, in practice, there are a couple of factors. First, we don't have the JCP. That means we don't have comittees designing things. Many features of J2EE are the result of compromises at the comittee level (OK, you can add entity beans if I can have cmp, or whatever). Most Ruby libraries are still the result (at least initially) of individual developers scratching itches.

But, you're right. This is something to fear.


Dave
15 years ago
Jruby is deeply significant if you work in a company with existing Java code. It lets you run new Ruby code alongside your existing Java code, sharing classes both ways. This means that you don't have to reimplement all those lbraries you spent the last 5 years writing.

At Euro RailsConf, I saw my Depot application running on JRuby in a JVM. It was using Java entity beans, via Active Record, to store data. That's a major, major win.


Dave
15 years ago
One of the big differentces beween Rails and (say) Maven is that in Rails, everything is integrated--it's all Ruby code, and it's all dynamic. Combine with with the conventions, and you dramatically reduce the overhead on a developer: you can, for the most part, concentrate on the important stuff--getting the job done--and leave it up to Rails and Ruby to do all the knitting for you.


Dave
15 years ago
A lot has changed--i fact much of the book has been rewritten. We use migrations, Ajax, mention REST, RJS, look at :through associations, and on and on. I'll let others who have both editions comment on whether the upgrade it worth it.


Dave
15 years ago
That's very kind: I really appreciate it.

We've got some neat titles coming out over the coming months: ava progrmers in particular will appreciate Rails for Java Programmers, which is a fast track was for Java developers to get up to speed with Rails.
15 years ago
Just about every convention in Rails can be overridden, so in theory you can always adapt to a legacy schema.

Having said that, there are times where this might get to be just too much of a pain. My advice would be to experiment with writing basic models that map any legacy schema you might be thinking of using, and seeing if it works, before comitting to the full application.
15 years ago
It's about $30.

Cheers

Dave
18 years ago

Originally posted by Gian Franco Casula:
Does your book treat the subject of unit testing
as an integral part of the software development
cycle and thus as something that grows from the
roots of the system.


Yes, but perhaps not in the way you meant.
Unit testing is testing for developers on code that they've just written (or code that they're about to write). As you develop a system, you also build an increasing corpus of tests, tests that should be run all the time to validate that recent changes haven't broken old code.
These unit tests are only indirectly tied to the functional evolution of the system. They aren't even a separately planned project activity. Instead, they're just something you do when coding. In the same way that you don't break out "compile code" on a project plan, you don't break out "unit test."
18 years ago