Suhaasi Karnik

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since Mar 15, 2004
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Recent posts by Suhaasi Karnik

Beautiful photos, Fred.
Potty training!! All the Best.
18 years ago
Lakshya should be a motivation for all those kids who feel like losers, when nothing seems to be going right, no matter what decision you take.
18 years ago
Hi,

When Eclipse is launched, it will take up the configuration settings from the eclipse.ini file, in which you can specify the VM args.

1. Edit the eclipse configuration settings file <EclipseHome>/eclipse.ini
2. You can specify your vm arguments in this file.

eg. -vm C:\j2sdk1.4.2_03\jre\bin\javaw.exe -vmargs -Xms256m -Xmx512m

Here,
-vm is used to specify the Java VM to be used.
-vmargs is used to specify the list of arguments to be passed to the VM.

However, these above setting will only change the memory given to your eclipse runtime, and not to any java applications which you may be running from within Eclipse. For such apps, you may have to set the VMargs, in the launch configuration dialogue box, where you create, manage and run your java apps.

ie. go to Run -> Run -> Java application -> arguments -> VM arguments. This will configure the VM of the actual java application that you are running thru Eclipse.

Hope this helps.
Suhaasi.
err.... I edited Shakespeare Sonnet LX....

http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com/sonn02.htm

18 years ago
Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore,
So does my BuildAll hasten to its end.
Each adding error with that which goes before,
In frequent succession, all I can do is contend.
Control, once in the main() of a public class,
Crawls to execution, wherewith, each thread,
the Eclipse steps over to glory, But alas...
Reviewer that gave, doth now his comments I dread.
I bugfix with a flourish set on by the running clock.
And delve the Sun(site) in the darkness of the night.
Feeding on the surety their code trail truth shall unlock.
And nothing stands but for his all-knowing sight,
And yet, to Tester, in hope, my code shall withstand,
Praising my worth, despite his cruel command.

-Suhaasi
18 years ago
Seriously Guys, its so frustrating... yet so simple.
I'm glad I got it ... it would have kept me awake for months had I not got it....
18 years ago
Hi,

Is it possible to find out all classes and/or subpackages of a given package using reflection?

Thanks in advance,
Suhaasi
19 years ago
Since you havent printed your entire stack trace, its difficult to pinpoint the exact problem, but all I can suggest as of now is:

This problem is fixed in WLS 6.1, Service Pack SP4. You can download the latest service pack and try deploying ur application again.

Hope this helps.

Regards,
Suhaasi
19 years ago
Actually Einstein must have solved it in his mind, without using sticky notes or tables.

I, however, needed Microsoft Excel to solve it.

But I DID IT!!!
19 years ago
A class is a structural and functional description of an object.
An object is an actual existence (instance) of that class. Different instances can have different structural features, but they all carry out the same functions basically.

Hence when you want to create a Book, you first create a class Book which has a variable called author, nameOfBook, category.

class Book
{
String author, nameOfBook, category;
Book(String a, String n, String c)
{
author = a; nameOfBook=n; category=c;
}
}

And then you create different objects of this class, such as

Book b1 = new Book("Peter van der Linden", "Just Java 2", "Software");
Book b2 = new Book("Carl Segan", "Contact", "Science Fiction");

Thus each object will be structurally similar but can have a different state, but will exhibit similar behaviour, since they all belong to the same class.
19 years ago
Hi,

You would find it easier to build your application using ant.
Refer to : http://e-docs.bea.com/wls/docs81/programming/environment.html

Regards,
Suhaasi
19 years ago
You could think of it in this way:
A class describes the structure of the object and its functionality.
Structure is described by member variables. eg. String item="airplane";
Functionality is described as methods. e.g. System.out.println("Zoooooom awaaaaaaay");
Hence System.out, which describes the behaviour of the object, goes in a method.
[ October 05, 2004: Message edited by: suhaasi karnik ]
19 years ago
You can configure your JMS settings, using the WebLogic Admin console.

1. Start the myserver.

2. Using the Administration console, configure the following:

3. Create a new JDBC Connection Pool.
e.g Name = MyConnectionPool
URL = jdbc:weblogic:mssqlserver4:MyDB@serverName:1433
Driver class = weblogic.jdbc.mssqlserver4.Driver (ensuring that the driver class is in the classpath)
Properties = databasename=MyDB user=sa
Target chosen = myserver

4. Create a new JMS ConnectionFactory.
e.g Name = exampleConnectionFactory
JNDIName = weblogic.examples.jms.QueueConnectionFactory
Target chosen = myserver

5. Create a new JMS store, using the JDBC Connection factory which you created in step 3.
6. Create a new JMS server, using the JMS store which you created in step5.
7. Click on "configure Destinations" to Configure the JMS destinations for this JMS server as follows:
a. Configure a new JMS queue for the new JMS server.
e.g Name = exampleQueue
JNDIName = weblogic.examples.jms.exampleQueue
EnableStore = default

b. Configure a new JMS topic for the new JMS server.
e.g. Name= exampleTopic
JNDIName = weblogic.examples.jms.exampleTopic
EnableStore = default
19 years ago
Java

----------------------------------------------
Hehe, back to the word we started with... )
19 years ago