Renee Dopplick

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Recent posts by Renee Dopplick

Kay > How many classes?
Luciano > Did you include any class like Session Bean, Facade, Service Locator, etc. inside your class diagram?

For this project, I think 10-20 classes is a rough estimate. Part of the confusion I think between what should be in the class diagram vs component diagram stems from the many examples, including the Sun example entitled: "Figure 11.9 Class Diagram Showing Sample Application Architectural Components" Notice the two words "class" and "component" in that figure title:
http://java.sun.com/blueprints/guidelines/designing_enterprise_applications_2e/app-arch/app-arch5.html
There is no definitive answer here. I tend towards the Cade/Roberts approach. Their class diagram includes processors (p.169).

- Renee
Yo, Bartender Bert,

The range just got a little more exciting with the Motorola i830 Mobile Phone. Unveiled today, the phone is compatible with Nextel.

Specs:
3.6 ounces
3.3 x 1.8 x 0.8 inches
Photo: http://www.motorola.com/mediacenter/graphics/detail/0,,3875_0-48,00.html

Features:
GPS - including visual and audible driving directions -- but if it's like the other GPS driving directions that are phone-based (like TeleNav), they are currently just too slow to be practical. If you are slowly riding your horse however, this phone just may be the ticket to get you up across the ranch and back without getting lost. I would go for a larger PDA with GPS if driving directions/location based services are your primary goal right now. Has anyone else had problems or successes using your GPS w/ driving direction phone?

Java - for all that fun stuff and with airplane mode, you can still run applications/games while in flight -- if you get a tech savvy cabin crew that understands you aren't "operating your phone". FAA regulations still apply so if they interpret it as using your phone, you'll still need to put the phone away.

Speakerphone and all those other services you would expect.

- Renee
The Allen/Bambara book may be of use if you already know a lot about J2EE. Otherwise, you may not recognize the errors in the book.
http://www.denverjava.com/resources/bookreviews_scea.html

I like the Cade/Roberts book and the information available through Sun.

J2EE Patterns
http://java.sun.com/blueprints/patterns/

Online Resources from Sun
http://java.sun.com/j2ee/

- Renee
Harish:

I did use labels in the component diagram. Likewise, I used the Sun recommended UML stereotypes.
http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/J2EE/patterns/UseOfUML.html

- Renee
Peter:
If you want to use a <<stereotype>>, consider using the ones that Sun uses. They list and define the ones used in the Patterns in this article:
http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/J2EE/patterns/UseOfUML.html
- Renee
Congrads Frederico!



- Renee
>> In fact,what puzzles me is whether we can both encapsulate the code of access relational database and the code of access external lagacy system which the interface is not java API based in one DAO.

Jacky:

DAO
If I read correctly, you want to know if you can have one DAO do two different things - access the external system and persist data locally to your RDBMS. Let me know if I'm reading your question incorrectly. Ideally, a DAO encapsulates the logic that is most efficient for accessing the data for a data source. The PetStore example may provide guidance for you. Look at how they handle the DAOs, such as the CatalogDAO.
http://java.sun.com/blueprints/patterns/DAO.html

I would also recommend looking over the online article "Advanced DAO Programming" for diagrams of DAOs and systems and the list of design considerations when deciding to use a DAO:
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-dao/

The following article on testing contains a good primer walkthrough of DAO and answers the question "Why had I implemented not just one, but two DAOs..."
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-sdao/

Class diagram.
Yes, you should include business domain objects. For this project, I think 10-20 classes is a rough estimate. Part of the confusion I think between what should be in the class diagram vs component diagram stems from the many examples, including the Sun example entitled: "Figure 11.9 Class Diagram Showing Sample Application Architectural Components" Notice the two words "class" and "component" in that figure title:
http://java.sun.com/blueprints/guidelines/designing_enterprise_applications_2e/app-arch/app-arch5.html
There is no definitive answer here. I tend towards the Cade/Roberts approach. Their class diagram includes processors (p.169).

- Renee
Peter:

1. How many component diagram have you submitted?
One. It could have been broken down into several but I wanted to see the whole thing at once. PingPing Lu who recently passed (5/26), also said that he submitted one component diagram.

2. Have you show every single JSPs in the component diagram?
No, I did not include every JSP.

3. If I want to use WAF, do I need to supply every single HTMLAction or EJBAction, or just represent a package named HTMLAction?
An application framework simplifies some implementation steps for you but that does not denote the exclusion of critical interactions represented in your architecture. You still need to communicate what is talking to what and why. You get to decide to what level of detail to include. I would think that including every HTML action would be bordering on implementation details, rather than architecture and design.

- Renee
Jacky,

Using a DAO is a decision you need to make. I cannot provide direct advice on that decision. I can provide a link to more information to help you make the decision:
http://java.sun.com/blueprints/corej2eepatterns/Patterns/DataAccessObject.html

Good luck making your decision! Remember to consider how you want to deal with persistent data and transactions.

- Renee
Ko Ko:

I think a good rule of thumb when time planning for this cert is to plan to study a minimum of 2-4 weeks for Part I and to budget a minimum of 100 hours for Part II/III.

You might complete Part II in less than that, but more likely, you'll use more, especially if you like to tweak or have frequent interruptions (like going to work, vacations, life ). A reasonable range estimate would be 100-400 hours for Part II, depending on your knowledge of J2EE, previous experience, and dedicated blocks of time. While you can spend less time, you may overlook some critical requirements. If you spend more time, you need to recognize that it is time to stop and submit.

Hope this helps! I posted some notes in the SCEA forum.

- Renee
17 years ago
Congratulations Rajat!

Great job!
- Renee
Congratulations PingPing!

That's a great score on the component diagram! Did you use just one diagram or did you break it into several? Any insights on your approach?
- Renee
James:

I did not make that assumption about EJB 2.0. Instead, I documented where the system could be improved during implementation or migration based upon changing business or technology needs. The documentation discussed the impacts of EJB spec changes, including that impact on NFRs, design patterns, upcoming JSRs, and open source tools.

Could very well be that you can assume 2.0 and explain its advantages over the previous spec. That falls into the grey area, as far I can determine.

- Renee
Jacky,
If you want to simplify the sequence diagram and eliminate B, you need to document, either as a note on the diagram or below in text. Clearly state that it is assumed that B delegates to C (or whatever you are implementing) but that it was omitted for simplicity. I wouldn�t recommend this approach though.

Authentication and authorization � I approached security as an Aspect, a cross-cutting concern. I did use user login. Review Chapter 32: Security in the J2EE 1.4 Tutorial.
http://java.sun.com/j2ee/1.4/docs/tutorial/doc/Security.html

- Renee
[ May 26, 2004: Message edited by: Renee Dopplick ]
Jacky:

> For your class diagram, did you mark these association relationship numbers?

In proper UML notation for a class diagram, standard multiplicity (e.g. 0..1, 1..*, etc) can be applied to associations. I think it is important to include multiplicity because you are indicating the boundaries and visually communicating important business information.

> A-->B--->C,and in sequence diagrams

Take a close look at the sequence diagrams for J2EE patterns. They are given within each pattern description. I think you�ll identify the key differences between your current diagrams and these examples.
http://www.corej2eepatterns.com/Patterns2ndEd/
http://java.sun.com/blueprints/corej2eepatterns/

Along those lines, you can find a sequence diagram example from Pet Store:
http://java.sun.com/blueprints/guidelines/designing_enterprise_applications_2e/sample-app/sample-app1.3.1a3.html

- Renee