Win a copy of Svelte and Sapper in Action this week in the JavaScript forum!

David Heffelfinger

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Recent posts by David Heffelfinger

Congratulations to all the winners! It was my pleasure to be here to answer questions about the book.

David
Are you sure you deployed it?

Also, you may be seeing a cached copy of your JSP output, try holding down the shift key while hitting "reload". If that doesn't work clear your browser's cache and try hitting "reload" again.

David

Originally posted by Paul Michael:
Wow, I didn't know it had Eclipse bindings.

That's one major reason why I'm a bit hesitant of trying Netbeans, I'm already used to too many Eclipse shortcuts.

Thanks David!



To change the key bindings, go to Tools | Options | Keymap then select the Eclipse profile.

David
Although I haven't clicked on every single item on the Woodstock sample application, for the items I clicked I haven't found unacceptable performance.

You can always report any issues you encounter to the woodstock issuezilla

David
Most book examples are simple, since I feel that using "realistic" examples results in a lot of extraneous code that has nothing to do with the topic at hand. Most of the examples are self contained, focused and to the point.

There is a chapter that builds a semi-realistic application using most of the APIs discussed in the book.

I feel confident that a reader starting with little or no Java EE knowledge (but with some Java knowledge) will be able to create real world applications after reading the book.

David
If you are familiar with Java EE the book will help you find NetBeans functionality that will make your life a lot easier.

The book does not assume Java EE knowledge, that way Java SE developers not familiar with Java EE can take advantage of it, however it will also be useful for developers familiar with Java EE so that they can quickly learn NetBeans functionality that can greatly increase their productivity.

David
TDD is not covered in the book, as I feel it would distract from illustrating the concept that the book aims to teach, which are Java EE APIs such as EJB 3, JSF, JPA and JAX-WS.

I am currently not involved in any projects that have standardized on TDD.

David

Originally posted by Srinivasan__:
Also David,
Tell me whether the Web-Services like SAAJ are also available in that book?



SAAJ is not covered in the book, however NetBeans features involving web service development such as exposing EJBs as web services and automatically generating all the "plumbing" code necessary to access a web service from client code is discussed in detail.

David

Originally posted by Srinivasan__:
Hi David,
I want to know whether the book "JAVA EE5" contains any information about the basics/fundamentals of the JMS and JavaMail also JNDI?
Because I am new to those topics, i want to learn a lot.



There is a chapter devoted to JMS and message driven beans.

In Java EE 5, it is not necessary to do JNDI lookups as often as it was when using J2EE 1.4 and earlier, since Java EE 5 introduces the concept of dependency injection via annotations. Most of the examples in the book use dependency injection as opposed to JNDI lookups.

JavaMail is not covered in this book, however my other book, "Java EE 5 Development Using GlassFish Application Server" includes material about JavaMail.

David

Originally posted by Kuldeep Yadav:
David,
While using Netbeans for JAX-WS, there is facility to create web service using WDSL.
But can I do reverse ?
Means can I generate WSDL using Web Service annoted class in NetBeans ?

[ November 04, 2008: Message edited by: Kuldeep Yadav ]



When deploying a web service through an annotated class to the application server, a WSDL is generated on the fly. This WSDL can be used by web service clients to access the functionality implemented in the web service class.

David
There is an appendix in the book that explains how to profile Java EE 5 applications using the NetBeans profiler.

David
The book covers the majority of standard Java EE 5 technologies and APIs such as developing web applications with JSF, EJB 3 development, object relational mapping with JPA, web service development with JAX-WS and more.

It also covers NetBeans' Visual Web JSF tool, which allows to build visually pleasing JSF pages by simply dragging and dropping components from a palette into a page.

Most chapters contain self contained simple and focused examples that illustrate one concept at a time, this approach helps minimize extraneous irrelevant code in the example.

There is one chapter that builds a semi-realistic application that takes advantage of several of the APIs discussed in the book, such as JSF/Visual JSF, JPA and EJB 3.

David
Seam and Ajax4JSF are not covered in the book since they are not part of the Java EE 5 specification, they are additional libraries and frameworks that build on top of it.

The book does cover the Woodstock JSF component library, since NetBeans has outstanding support for it out of the box via the Visual Web JSF tool.

My other book, "Java EE 5 Development Using GlassFish Application Server" has brief coverage of both Seam and Ajax4JSF.

David
As far as I know there are no benchmarks comparing IntelliJ IDEA and NetBeans.

David
As far as I know there are no benchmarks comparing the two IDEs.

David