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Jim Harris

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since Jan 10, 2005
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Recent posts by Jim Harris

Yes, exactly the main question I want to ask; thanks, Anup, for the excellent details. These are the considerations I would add, which all boil down to cost-effectiveness over the life of the developed Application, which for us is the main factor determining which platform and approach should be used. How does JBoss compare in:

Maintainability of code (including generating documentation)?

Stability of code (built on standards that are not likely to be superseded, so apps don't have to be updated/rewritten)?

Transportability of code (e.g. runs on various OSs, in various VM managers)?

Flexibility of apps, e.g. easy to interface via API, use in SOA, etc.?

Thanks for your thoughts.

Jim
12 years ago
Thank you, Sir !

Sorry I have not been able to reply until now.

I agree with your principles/goals and reasoning, and your conclusions re Tapestry 5. You did not, however, mention why you think it reaches those goals best, compared to other development "Frameworks" (in the broad sense of the term) that are popular or that you think are among the best, or anything about the expected longevity of Tapestry.

I think these consideration are important in choosing a Framework. As I am sure many would agree, I think it is important to choose a good horse if one is to ride long or through tough battles on it.

Thanks again, and regards,

Jim
Hello.

Please say a little about why you chose to invest such a portion of your life, energy and such promoting this particular development method, as opposed to any of several other popular/serious contenders for the same goals. For example, do you think it will outlive most others, and why do you think Eclipse will not be enhanced/have plugins offered to achieve the same goals and more?

Thanks.

Jim
Here's an example:

Using IBM Rational Software Architect, a large, very capable and quite expensive Plug-In to Eclipse providing GUI JSF development (and much more) capability, I have built an entire JSF application, with Oracle back-end, without ever _seeing_ even a single line of code, let alone writing one, and not knowing or caring how it displays anything. I haven't the foggiest of notions how it does anything, though I know (from my expert associates) that it generates absolutely standard JSF.

The application works perfectly, though I have not put any security/login process in it.

I took me a while to learn how to do this, but now I can build such an application, with three or four screens, pretty much from scratch in a day or so, and it's both stable and maintainable.

IHTH

Jim
14 years ago
JSF
Is anyone aware of any new tools planned for JSF application development, or existing tools that plan to add JSF support?
14 years ago
JSF
Replying to Ed Burns' Sep 12 post:

Thanks vey much for supporting the spirit of open discussion; it makes me really want to go buy the book, in fact.

But I have a couple of specific points about your IDE list "in decreasing order of quality of support [of JSF application development]":

Sun JavaStudio Creator
Exadel Studio
Oracle JDeveloper
NetBeans 5
Eclipse

1. Re Sun JavaStudio Creator, see my post of a few minutes ago.

2. Why is IBM Rational Software Architect, which many (including me) believe is by far the best tool in all respects, not even mentioned?

3. Eclipse alone is not much good. I would add at least something like MyEclipse (with its excellent collection of Plug-Ins, tested compatibility, fairly complete tool set for a Software Development Project, good support, etc.) to get a good start on collecting the editors, test managers etc. desired/needed. Is this what you had in mind, and if so, do you have specific Plug-In recommendations?

Same question (#3) for anyone.

Thanks again.

Jim
14 years ago
JSF
Good stuff, thanks, all.

Another important feature I did not mention is maintainability.

I have heard that Java Studio Creator depends for its apparent magic on a huge collection of extensively specialized classes, and thus, though you can easily build an app, it is virtually impossible to edit, using normal editors e.g. in Eclipse, any of the resulting code (to change, for example, the color of a background) because the real Java / JSF is buried so deeply it cannot be found by normal means.

The code generated by the huge (4 GB plus) and expensive (but really good and well-supported) Eclipse Plug-In called IBM Rational Software Architect, on the other hand, generates absolutely standard, straightforward, easily maintained JSF code. I _think_ it preserves manual code edits thru successive GUI edits and re-generations (another requirement), but its support of "reverse engineering" is debatable.

Has anyone any significant experience with these concerns/features/lack thereof? Any agreement/disagreement on their relative value, or other ways within the IDE (again, preferably Eclipse) to achieve the goal of keeping the code and model in sync (not only for documentation of code but also of Requirements Management etc.)?

Thanks again for good discussion.

Jim
14 years ago
JSF
Excellent, thanks, Chris.

Since I don't have access to the book and only have urgent need for this one fact, would you mind sending the names of those "IDE's that support JSF", hopefully ones that support it in the manner I described?

Jim
14 years ago
JSF
Hello.

I am looking for a combination of tools, preferably Eclipse Plug-Ins, that well support JSF, including GUI web-page design and generating JSF code from it (like Rational Software Architect (RSA) does), keeping the code and UML models in sinc (which no tool I know of, including RSA, does well), and of course using information about code, tests passed, requirements, and others in the Model/Project to generate useful views of status/progress etc.

Many tools do all this and more with UML to/from C++ and Java, but not JSF. Is there any reason this should be?

Thanks for any pointers, etc.

Jim
14 years ago
JSF
The new IBM Rational tools ("Atlantic" Release, 2004-12-05?) support JSF or soon will. I believe this means their App Server, IBM WebSphere, also does. Confirm, anyone?
15 years ago
JSF